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How to work effectively with media in India

How to work effectively with media in India

India is the second most populated country in the world. It has an astounding diversity of religions, languages and cultures. Along with this, India has a flourishing media scene, with thousands of outlets operating in multiple languages. The mainstream media has more freedom that even before. The use of social media has grown exponentially with the increase in availability of technology. As a result, the media industry in India has expanded tremendously, so now is the time to focus on public relations and secure some great coverage.
How to work effectively with media in China

How to work effectively with media in China

China is home to an estimated 1.3 Billion people, is the world’s second largest economy and has one of the one of the largest media markets in the world. Unsurprisingly, being able to tap into it is a highly appealing prospect for any higher education institution.
What the Heck? When PR stunts backfire

What the Heck? When PR stunts backfire

It’s been a nightmare month for Heck sausages. PR doesn’t get much worse than having #boycott[insertyourproductname] trend on Twitter, which is exactly what happened in the UK following a controversial decision by the Heck marketing team.
Are PRs doing their homework? What we learnt from MaKi 2019

Are PRs doing their homework? What we learnt from MaKi 2019

The BlueSky Education team have just returned from another fantastic MaKi business media conference, and as always, we were delighted to sponsor the event!
Is traditional public relations redundant in modern politics?

Is traditional public relations redundant in modern politics?

Public image and politics have always gone hand in hand. Think JFK ensuring he looked as sharp as possible in the 1960 presidential TV debates in which he overwhelming beat his opposition, Richard Nixon. Think Margaret Thatcher before her election in 1979, taking lessons with a speech coach to help lower her pitch and develop a calm, authoritative tone. Think Tony Blair, in 1994, hiring Alistair Campbellas his press secretary and spokesperson for the Labour party. All of these are examples of politicians taking steps to try and shape and control their own public image.
A Guide to Ghost-writing

A Guide to Ghost-writing

Ghost writing is a delicate balancing act. A great ghost writer must master the ability to capture the voice of their subject, without losing their own. Here at BlueSky, we regularly have the privilege of ghost writing for our clients. From high-powered alumni short of time, to brilliant professors lacking the English fluency to do their research justice; we’re never without plenty of engaging articles to produce.
How PRs should prepare for business education conferences

How PRs should prepare for business education conferences

Business education conferences can be very productive, but they can be a stressful experience if you do not prepare properly.
How to secure media interviews for travelling faculty

How to secure media interviews for travelling faculty

International coverage is, arguably, the most important product of business school PR departments. Not only does international recognition build the brand at a much larger scale, coverage can also be used to reach new markets for student recruitment, to promote new courses and to showcase global alumni, amongst many other things.
How to hire a PR agency – advice for universities

How to hire a PR agency – advice for universities

Whether it’s for a short-term project or long-term support, are you considering hiring a PR agency? If so, how’s the best way to go about this as a university?
How to ensure your content has as much impact as possible

How to ensure your content has as much impact as possible

There are no two ways about it, creating great, insightful content for your institution is always a good thing. However, it is extremely difficult to measure how much of real impact each piece of content actually has on the reader and whether or not this has a long-lasting effect.
How to write a viral press release on academic research

How to write a viral press release on academic research

Its trendy at the moment to say the ‘press release is dead’. And while I would agree that the media industry has gone through a dramatic shift in recent years, that doesn’t necessarily mean the demise of the press release.
Should business schools use influencer marketing and PR?

Should business schools use influencer marketing and PR?

When we think of influencer marketing and PR, some may wonder what use it really holds outside of promoting charcoal toothpaste or online clothing brands. One assumption we make is that those with the most followers are the most valuable. And, perhaps, they are. Even for business schools, having a shout out from Kylie Jenner, with her 130 million Instagram followers, would surely cause a surge in applications from around the globe. Some may not be candidates that would usually be considered, but we know that Generation Z is especially entrepreneurial and it’s hard to miss the inspiration they may take from someone who, at 21 years old, is the world’s youngest self-made billionaire.
How to get coverage for your business school in a changing press landscape

How to get coverage for your business school in a changing press landscape

Who else is sick of the phrase ‘the rapid pace of change’?
7 steps to securing meetings for your faculty abroad

7 steps to securing meetings for your faculty abroad

Whether accompanying MBA students on international study trips, attending overseas recruitment fairs or speaking at industry events, such excursions provide the ideal opportunity to raise the profile of their school on a wider scale by engaging with local media.
What can PR’s learn from the Shamima Begum story?

What can PR’s learn from the Shamima Begum story?

One pregnant teenager. So much controversy Shamima Begum’s face has been plastered across every front page in the UK over the last two weeks. The media storm has been a sensationalist dream for many outlets (arguably, far too many). A story in which the words ‘school girl’, ‘baby’ and ‘ISIS’ can all be crammed into one headline provides clickbait gold for a national news industry increasingly relying on SEO and digital content optimisation to keep itself afloat.
Is Brexit a chance for British business schools to strengthen their brand?

Is Brexit a chance for British business schools to strengthen their brand?

Despite the turbulence of life in the UK at the moment, working out just how we might leave the EU, the country is still open for business. It’s time that business schools properly communicate their worth in today’s political climate.
International PR offices – are they really needed to get international coverage?

International PR offices – are they really needed to get international coverage?

You’re looking for a PR firm to help out with your international PR efforts and come across a firm that states “we have offices based in New York, London, Hong Kong, Paris and Berlin, in order to penetrate our key markets in the most effective way possible”.

What PRs can learn from Fyre Festival

If you are social media savvy, live in North America or are under the age of 25, you may have already heard of the catastrophe that was Fyre Festival. Or if, like me, you have been doing Dry January, you may have discovered it through the documentary Fyre: The Greatest Party That Never Happened, which recently aired on Netflix.
Why storytelling is vital to Business School PR

Why storytelling is vital to Business School PR

Why we tell MBA stories to increase applications for Business Schools Storytelling is often considered vital for human survival. It’s how we have communicated since we were sat in caves – I think it is just as important now as it was then. And in the world of PR there often needs to be an emphasis on storytelling over selling.
How to attract faculty

How to attract faculty

Business schools and universities are successful for a number of reasons, their longevity, their location, their specialities, but their life blood is the quality of their teaching and research - and for this they need the best academics.  It’s a highly competitive global market and there are never enough good academics about – so focusing on how to attract faculty is key.   How do you optimise your chances of getting the best people?   Firstly, you need to get on their radar.  You need to be publicising your institution.  As we’ve discussed previously, PR is more effective than advertising – advertising these days suffers from the worldliness of any readership – people view adverts with the viewpoint, “well you are going to say that because you’re paying for an advert.”   Instead, it is a question of publicising your institution in a way that gives you third party affirmation – you want to be pushing yourself out to show that you are an employer of choice.  You need to have PR about what it is like to be an academic at your institution, how good the leadership is and the environment.   What are academics looking for from an employer?   When it boils down to it, academics are going to choose where to go based on the institute reputation, how much they get paid, and what their career prospects are.  But also, academics live and die by their research (and their teaching), that’s how they move forward, by continuing to publish new material.  Beyond this, academics also, particularly in the business school world, don’t live solely on campus, an awful lot of them have a sort of a permeable membrane between the business world and the academic world, and so they want to be working with companies and providing consultancy.   Academics want to be known, and be on the radar of big companies, so that when they are thinking about getting in a business school academic to advise on a particular topic or be on the board for a particular project, they are the first academic that comes to mind.   How does this compare with your institute’s objectives?   Popularising and wider dissemination of your academics’ research is very important from the business school and university point of view, because it shows you have great academics working there and that they are doing interesting research.  But it is also good for the individual academic because they are getting known in the circles that they might be recruited for consultancy work.  The CEO or C-Suite type person isn’t going to be poring over an academic journal but if he reads of an academic’s work in the Economist or The Wall Street Journal etc. it’s going to get noticed.  
Understanding the Media: Tips for Business Schools and Universities

Understanding the Media: Tips for Business Schools and Universities

Another month, another influx of pioneering research papers. But which ones are destined for the headlines? The first step to securing phenomenal press coverage for business schools and universities is to identify exactly which research, and which student or alumni success stories, are most likely to catch the media’s attention. It’s equally vital to know when material lends itself to a press release, to an opinion editorial or to interview articles. Sound complicated? Not to worry, these tasks fall to us. Recognising press trends in business and higher education There are some trends in the news cycle that can be tapped into time and time again; internationally hot topics today include blockchain, diversity and AI. Looking beyond these, different nations’ press networks have their own tailored interests; UK media, for example, is predictably receptive to any particularly insightful comment on Brexit. Exploiting these popular themes might generate quick hits, but standing out to a journalist in amongst a sea of PR pitches is ultimately about thinking outside the box. What haven’t people heard about yet? Which publications reach your target audience most effectively? Or who can offer comment on a popular topic, from an alternative perspective?
BlueSky Education’s Key Topics of 2018

BlueSky Education’s Key Topics of 2018

As we enter 2019, now seems a better time than any to look back over the previous year and some of its key themes for business schools. Working with schools across 10 different countries, BlueSky Education naturally has an abundance of professors who have a lot to say on a wide range of topics. In fact, in 2018 alone BlueSky Education delivered over 1,000 pieces of unique coverage for its clients across a whole host of areas, in international, national and trade publications. Let’s take a look at three of the top themes which featured the prominently in BlueSky Education’s coverage this year: Artificial Intelligence (AI) Despite the actual nuts and bolts of how it operates being unbeknown to most, AI still managed to be a topic which dominated much of the news agenda in 2018. Whether it be the world’s first AI news anchor unveiled in China, the launch of Uber’s driverless cars or the Robot Football World Cup in the summer, the topic of AI was something that was on the lips of many this year. The discussion around AI is one that many of BlueSky education’s clients also contributed to, with over 40 pieces of coverage being focused on this topic, including this piece on Uber’s partnership with one of our clients, Ecole Polytechnique, in a bid to create flying taxis, which featured in The Guardian, BBC and CNN. Or this piece of research from a professor at one of our clients, BI Norwegian Business School, which showed how emerging economies were more open to AI for business management purposes, which featured in Forbes. Gender diversity
Christmas tips for PRs

Christmas tips for PRs

The media industry often sees Christmas as a time to wind down and relax and even minimise pitching or distributing press releases. However, I think Christmas can offer PR’s gems of wisdom and tips, below I have summarised my top three. 1. Make a list, check it twice Making strong journalist lists is pivotal to being a good PR person, especially if you are dealing with a number of different journalists and media opportunities at the same time. Santa Claus makes a list of all the children he needs to deliver presents to, and also so his elves make the right presents and don’t miss any children. When PR’s are sending out that all important news worthy press release, they need to make sure they’re not missing out on any key journalists. 2. Follow a star Every PR person should be utilising all of their key spokespeople. Here at BlueSky Education we are always promoting and directing journalists to key professors, Deans and researchers and we’re listening to their opinions and expertise.  This is particularly useful when their area of expertise is a news topic or they have a recently published research paper. The three wisemen didn’t get lost because they followed a star, PR’s should know which stars to follow. 3. Make sure there’s room at the Inn Don’t pitch a story that has already been talked about from every side. It’s too difficult to be spotted in a crowded market. My advice would be either pick a different story to promote or come up with a new angle on a pre-existing story. Mary and Joseph couldn’t fit in the Inn they had to find an alternative sleep in the stable, I think the same can be applied to PR as you shouldn’t try and get in somewhere where you simply don’t fit.   Christmas is also a great time to show kindness to the media, especially those journalists you frequently contact and who regularly publish stories from your clients. From all of us at BlueSky PR we wish you a Merry Christmas.
2018 in numbers - BlueSky Education

2018 in numbers - BlueSky Education

More than 100: mentions for our clients in the FT, Forbes, and the BBC targeted press releases delivered mentions for our clients in QS Top MBA, AMBA, Biz Ed Magazine, THE, BusinessBecause, and Poets&Quants
Needle in a Maystack: Making your Brexit pitch stand out

Needle in a Maystack: Making your Brexit pitch stand out

Brexit has become hard to escape. It seems that every time you open a newspaper, turn on the radio or check your rear-view mirror, BAM there it is.
Return on Investment: How to Measure the Real Value of PR

Return on Investment: How to Measure the Real Value of PR

Return on Investment. The crux of so many PR client meetings. Gone are the days of walking into a client’s office with a stack of newspapers that they’ve been featured in since the beginning of your contract; no longer can the value of PR be realistically measured by how much the table shakes when you drop that stack of coverage. So, how can it be measured?
How do you differentiate your business school from others in a crowded market?

How do you differentiate your business school from others in a crowded market?

In November, I had the pleasure of hearing from and spending time with representatives from some of Europe’s best and well-known business schools, at the GMAC European Conference in Berlin.
Top 5 tips for higher education PRs

Top 5 tips for higher education PRs

If you want to be a good PR person you need an effective strategy, working in the media is competitive and PR is often more of an art form than a sales technique.
Who are you pitching to?

Who are you pitching to?

When sending a pitch to a journalist, what’s the first thing you need to check before hitting send? Checking your information is accurate perhaps? Making sure it’s short, swift and to the point? Making sure you’ve spelled their name correctly?
Why academic writing doesn’t work for the media

Why academic writing doesn’t work for the media

The appetite for academic research in the media is huge. Studies and statistics lend credibility to comment pieces and provide great insight into current trends. But it’s not quite as straight forward as throwing dissertations at journalists!
3 reasons why travel is key for good PR

3 reasons why travel is key for good PR

Hans Christian Andersen once famously said that ‘to travel is to live’. And while my grandmother never left the British Isles – she was genuinely even afraid to cross big bridges near her home in the countryside – we now live in a world with sprawling cities, where we regularly board planes, cross borders and travel the world.
Why PR shouldn’t be judged by the volume of coverage

Why PR shouldn’t be judged by the volume of coverage

When reporting back to your clients or manager, would you rather show them 20 individual pieces of PR coverage you’ve gained, or five? Naturally, you’re always going to say 20. The more coverage you gain for a client or business the better surely? It’s just more evidence of your value and more proof that their money is being well spent on PR, isn’t it?
Is hiring a PR agency right for your business school?

Is hiring a PR agency right for your business school?

As a specialist PR agency in the business education market, there are plenty of reasons why schools choose to bring us on board. If you’re considering hiring a specialist consultancy like us too (or you’re just here out of professional curiosity) then it’s probably time to look more closely at what having an agency’s support could achieve. With institutions having such wildly varying goals, here are a number of reasons why a business school might want to work with us: Raising the profile of a key member of faculty – perhaps the Dean of the business school or a renowned academic. Getting coverage in the press that hits both the quantity and quality mark can effectively boost a significant person’s profile. We often use the example of securing an op-ed for a professor in The Guardian that lead to him being inviting to speak at the World Economic Forum. Results like this speak for themselves. Boosting applications for certain programmes – are application numbers for your MBA lower than you’d like them to be? Get that course into the right press – show off your students, highlight that incredible alumni, position that academic lead – and watch the knock-on effect of climbing student application numbers. Appealing to quality students - Your EMBA not getting the quality of applicant that you really desire? Are you in need of better scholarship applicants? Placing articles within the right media outlets, like the Financial Times or The Economist, can attract a high calibre student. Numbers aren’t everything after all, getting quality applicants is vital.

Could good PR save Elon Musk?

It has been an interesting few weeks for Elon Musk. His recent tweet that he had “funding secured” to take Tesla, a $50bn public company, private, sparked a wealth of problems for regulators, investors and his board. Although initially stocks jumped in value, it came to light that the tweet was not approved by anyone else at the company and that funding was not completely secured. This provoked an investigation by US financial regulators into whether the tweet broke trading laws, sending stocks plummeting and costing investors millions. Musk also faced criticism for his choice of listing stock value as ‘$420’ as the number has become synonymous with cannabis use in the US. A flurry of articles appeared questioning his sobriety including allegations from rapper Azealia Banks that he was indeed taking drugs at the time of the tweet. Shortly after, Elon Musk gave an erratic interview to the New York Times during which he said the past year at the company had been “excruciating”. With an almost tangible sense of desperation in his tone and much conjecture that this was merely a damage control tactic, Tesla shares fell more than 8.5% in early trading. Elon Musk is indisputably the face of Tesla and is hugely valuable to the company – so how much damage has he done and could great PR save him? It’s hard to escape the sense that we are complicit in the widely-publicised breakdown of a very talented but hugely overworked man. And this revelation isn’t necessarily out of the blue – Musk was recently widely criticised for tweeting that Vern Unsworth, one of the divers that rescued the Thai schoolboys earlier this year, was a ‘pedo guy’. This was in retaliation to Unsworth’s claims that the miniature submarine Musk intended to save those stranded “had absolutely no chance of working” because the inventor “had no conception of what the cave passage was like”. It appears that the time has come for the company to invest in a respected and well-recognised executive who is capable of growing a business of this size, rather than relying on a visionary who often sleeps on the factory floor. If this were to happen soon, which I believe it should in order to restore public faith in the management of the company, Musk would have to take on a different role, perhaps as a chief operating officer. But could these actions spin the situation on its head? It’s unlikely, due to the impending US Securities and Exchange Commission investigation which could, theoretically, sanction or fine Tesla or even remove Musk from serving on the board. The conundrum the SEC now faces is that if it does not punish Musk, it unleashes a whole new set of dynamics in the public markets. It could normalise – or at least destigmatise – chief executives’ use of social media to move stock. Giving clemency to the ‘special circumstances’ of Musk’s teary confessions that he barely sleeps and is essentially in the whirlwind of a personal breakdown would mean that all public companies should receive the same treatment. Unsurprisingly, Tesla has hired a well-regarded PR agency who will no doubt be advising on the situation in order to mitigate the worst results of the SEC investigation. I will definitely be keeping my eyes on what happens next!
3 PR fails of the week

3 PR fails of the week

This last week has provided a lot of PR fails - which have been so awful, they have literally made headlines themselves. Here are my top three. Melania Trump The first, and possibly the worst, PR fail is Melania Trump’s jacket. It’s fair to say that President Trump and the first lady have faced a lot of criticism, but somehow, I think wearing a jacket to visit a migrant child detention centre that says ‘I really don’t care, do you?’  is possibly one of the most insensitive things Melania could have done. Unfortunately for her, Melania Trump's apparently empathetic visit to the Mexican border is now completely overshadowed by the unempathetic message on the back of her jacket. Burger King Another embarrassing PR fail this week comes from Russian Burger King. Obviously seizing the opportunity to make headlines with the world’s media spotlight on Russia thanks to the World Cup,  Burger King Russia decided to create a social media campaign offering free burgers for life to women who get pregnant by a football player. “Each will receive 3 million rubles, and a lifelong supply of Whoppers. For these girls, it will be possible to get the best football genes and will lay down the success of the Russian national team on several generations ahead. Forward! We believe in you!" Burger King in Russia have since apologised for the social media campaign. I would have thought that Burger King wouldn’t want to encourage Russia having a bad reputation for playing on sexist stereotypes, particularly in advertising, but this campaign really felt like something from the 1950’s.

To blog or not to blog? The benefits of blogging for business schools

There are 409 million blogs on Tumblr alone. Although this statistic may feel intimidating and evoke a sense of shouting into the void, business schools should actively try and engage with blogging. Schools should be aiming to post new information frequently, whether this be regarding new faculty, student diaries or exciting changes within the department. In this digital age, blogging should become an integral part of your marketing plan as it can help you to gain prominence in your field and set you apart from your competitors. I will now outline four reasons why you should get involved:
MaKi London 2018: EdTech and the future of biz-ed

MaKi London 2018: EdTech and the future of biz-ed

This week the annual MaKi London media conference rolled around and, as per usual, BlueSky Education was a proud sponsor of the event.
How to utilise social media to gain greater exposure for your client’s coverage

How to utilise social media to gain greater exposure for your client’s coverage

Social media is a great platform to share and gain greater exposure for your client coverage. However, many people are mistaken into thinking that simply posting a link to this coverage is enough to entice people to click the link and view the content. In a generation where people are seeking the quickest, most engaging and informative stories, a simple link with no extra added content is not enough to convince people to view your coverage. Here are a few tips on how to form your social media posts so that your client coverage gets the best exposure possible: Include insightful comment Including thought-provoking and insightful quotes from your coverage in your post will encourage more people to click on and read your client’s coverage. The quotes will act as a teaser for those who are interested in the subject and give them a short snippet of what to expect from the piece, encouraging them to read the article for more. Use relevant hash tags Including hashtags which are relevant to the articles subject area in your post will gain greater exposure within its specific targeted audience. The likelihood is that your own personal social media accounts do not have a large, specific following of all the subject areas that your clients gain media coverage within - adding these hashtags will make your content more accessible to those who it is targeted at. Encourage discussion Posting a link to your coverage and including a call to action such as asking for thoughts and comments from other social media users will not only encourage more people to read the article, but also encourage interaction from them joining in with the discussion and getting people talking about your clients. Tag relevant people Tagging the relevant social media accounts, such as your client and the news outlet which your coverage appears in, will directly inform them of the coverage and encourage them to both interact with it and share it. This will expose the coverage to a much larger and diverse audience, thus gaining it a greater readership.
Top PR mistakes and how to avoid them

Top PR mistakes and how to avoid them

Making a mistake when you’re a PR professional is not only costly but also detrimental to your company’s reputation, which in some cases may never be regained. So here are three of the key mistakes to avoid making when planning and executing your PR strategy. Bad timing Lesson one: Timing can work against you. Particularly when there’s not enough time to prepare in advance of an event or when you’re trying to organise interviews with journalists but your client doesn’t leave you with enough notice to make arrangements. To combat this, PRs should be advising their clients on how the media industry works and how you need to allow time to effectively get results. Here at BlueSky Education we pay attention to timing. We regularly promote academic research but we make sure we do it when relevant content is a hot topic in the media, and we target journalists that are writing about it. Be Reliable You don’t like it when people cancel meetings at the last minute, so try to avoid letting journalists down. It’s important to build lasting relationships with journalists based on them trusting you. If you can’t help them, let them know right away, don’t make promises that you can’t deliver on. The same goes for dealing with your clients, do not be flaky and make sure they are always in the loop.
Why you should always meet your deadlines, and what to do when you don’t

Why you should always meet your deadlines, and what to do when you don’t

Meeting deadlines is vital. It is not rocket science to see why this is such an important rule in PR.
Why a business school’s faculty is the best comms tool they have

Why a business school’s faculty is the best comms tool they have

The international business school market is becoming increasingly crowded. There are over 13,000 business schools in the world, and you have the tough task of convincing students and faculty that your school is the right one for them.
How PRs should use Twitter as a professional tool

How PRs should use Twitter as a professional tool

Social media platform Twitter boasts over 330 million global users, and has quickly become the go to site for journalists, PRs and the general population, to view and share news. With around three quarters of journalists using Twitter every day and over 70% of them stating that Twitter is a valuable professional tool, it harnesses the potential to be a great platform for PRs to utilise, to the benefit of themselves and their clients. However, with around 500 million tweets sent every day, it can be hard for PRs to really stand out from the crowd, and reap the full benefits of the social media platform. So, here are a few simple tips on how a PR professional should utilise Twitter. Follow and engage with relevant journalists With the majority of journalists regularly active on Twitter, it is the perfect place to connect with them – simply by engaging with their content. This is a great way to build a personal relationship with a journalist, by liking, replying and sharing your opinion on their tweets. This will strengthen the relationship between you and a journalist, making you more memorable - which is likely to make them look more favourably upon any stories and ideas that you decide to pitch to them.
Old fashioned PR principles still get results

Old fashioned PR principles still get results

The media and its approach to news has changed, it’s not enough to churn out a press release and hope it will be picked up by established media such as The Financial Times, Times, Telegraph and Guardian.

What three films can teach us about PR

Now that I’ve entered the world of PR, I can see the lessons that some films can teach us about the varied world of public relations. I’ve selected three film quotes that stood out to me and the messages they convey about this industry. Be creative “Almost Famous” is the story of a young, up and coming journalist in the 1960s who is given the job of interviewing his favourite band. He ends up in a world of sex, drugs, and rock and roll, without his overprotective mother knowing, he ends up falling in love with one of the bands most infamous groupies. My favourite PR quote from the film is: “Is it hard to make us look cool?” Making your client appear interesting to the media is a major aspect of public relations, and sometimes it seems impossible to make them “look cool”. In the world of Business Education, sometimes clients want you distribute challenging research, or a story that might have already been told. This is why creativity is important, taking the time to come up with a new angle in order to provide the media with a fresh way of telling, or adding to, a story. If you can successfully execute this, you will build your clients' profiles and credibility around the world, essentially making them “look cool”. Don't over-complicate things “One Day” is about two university graduates who spend the night together after their graduation ceremony. Dexter and Em are shown each year on the same date to see where they are in their lives, sometimes they are together, sometimes they are not. The best PR quote from this film is: “I think we like to complicate things when really it’s quite simple”. To successful grab an editor’s attention you have to develop the knack of writing in a simple way, making the wording engaging and understandable. The same can be said when working with university research, to transfer it from academic language into a message that you can send to the media which is as simplistic as possible. This is the best way to reach a wider audience. Make the right decisions
What would BlueSky PR study at business school?

What would BlueSky PR study at business school?

Working with business schools on day-to-day basis, you learn about the incredible array of courses that they offer. With some specialisms like luxury attracting very different profiles to finance or perhaps entrepreneurship, I wondered what our team would be interested in studying.
Why relationship building is essential for PR success

Why relationship building is essential for PR success

Relationship building is key when it comes to gaining success in public relations – especially in the world of business schools. 
Easy New Year’s Resolutions for PRs

Easy New Year’s Resolutions for PRs

Now is the time to make some professional resolutions which will make you a better, more productive PR person.
Cut out the complex words to get media attention

Cut out the complex words to get media attention

From the Daily Mirror to the Wall Street Journal, pretty much every widely-read newspaper uses clear language for their readers.
How to use news trends to gain great coverage for your clients

How to use news trends to gain great coverage for your clients

As 2017 comes to a close, you’d be forgiven for thinking the only significant (or fake!!) news stories this year have involved the Brexit negotiations and Donald Trump. However, if you look a little closer, or have somehow managed to block the words ‘Brexit’ and ‘Trump’ from appearing on your phone (please let me know how!), there has been a number of other news stories on the agenda in 2017 – each of which has provided opportunities for the savvy PR operator. So as the year comes to an end, here are just some examples of how to use news trends and how BlueSky earned great coverage for our clients. Gender pay gap In July, the BBC succumbed to pressure and revealed the salaries of its biggest stars. In doing so they highlighted again, the substantial gender pay gap that exists in most organisations, with the highest paid male, Chris Evans (no, I’m not sure why he gets paid so much either), earning almost 400% more than the highest paid female. The report created a trend of news stories focusing on gender in the workplace and equal pay, which even persuaded the UK government to order all large firms to publish their own salary figures. This provided BlueSky with an opportunity to promote research from one of our clients, which found that women scored higher than men in four out of five leadership skill categories, making them better leaders. Not only was this research highly relevant, but it helped to further the discussion on why the gender pay gap exists. Our press release received coverage in over 40 different publications, including The Times and The Metro. Artificial Intelligence (AI) and robotics
Why robots could write the news – for some people

Why robots could write the news – for some people

When I walked into work this morning, I could hear giggling before I even opened the door. Kerry, a Senior Account Manager and Funny News Finder, had emailed us all a link to a story about a new robot author. The author was created by the team at Botnik, a community of writers, artists and developers who collaborate with machines to create ‘strange new things’. They had fed all seven Harry Potter novels through their predictive text keyboard and instructed it to compose a chapter from a new Harry Potter story. The result is called Harry Potter and the Portrait of what Looked like a Large Pile of Ash and it’s well worth a read. *Spoiler alert* ‘“Not so handsome now,” thought Harry as he dipped Hermione in hot sauce. The Death Eaters were dead now, and Harry was hungrier than he had ever been.’ Hilarious. But this got me thinking – could robots ever tell us stories? Google certainly thinks so. As we speak, the company is pouring money into a robot journalism project in which computers will write 30,000 stories a month for local media. The project will be run by five human journalists, who will use official open data sources to automate reports about health, crime, employment and other subjects. Despite the overwhelming majority of experts and research suggesting that automated articles would lack the insight needed in subjective topics – for example, imagine the intricacies of a court cases or political matters – it appears that there are numerous companies already operating in this area.