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Can a modern brand survive without a presence on social media?

Can a modern brand survive without a presence on social media?

When pub chain JD Wetherspoon recently announced its decision to shut down all of its social media channels – including Twitter, Facebook and Instagram – with immediate effect, it raised eyebrows, not least from those who understand how a presence on those platforms can add value to a business, if they are used strategically. Chairman Tim Martin said, in a now deleted tweet, “We are going against conventional wisdom that these platforms are a vital component of a successful business,” adding that the managers of its 900 pub branches agreed with him. He later told a journalist that, "On a commercial basis, it saves people in the company time and that will enable them to get on with their own jobs." Devise a social media strategy There are a few puzzling things about this decision. Firstly, Wetherspoons had more than 44,000 Twitter followers and more than 100,000 followers on Facebook. Clearly, there was an interest from customers in having social media engagement with the brand. However, interactions on these platforms were very moderate, with many posts receiving only a handful of likes. For a big company with so many followers, such a low level of engagement should have raised a red flag indicating that it hadn’t mastered the art of delivering relevant content to its followers which truly engaged them. The demand was there, but the social media strategy clearly wasn’t. Businesses need to have a clear idea of who they are targeting, what they want to say and how best to convey that message. If The Museum of English Rural Life can achieve nearly 107,000 likes (and counting) with its perfectly judged tweet about a ram, then Wetherspoons really needed to be thinking more creatively and aiming for far higher levels of engagement, adjusting the strategy if it wasn’t appearing to work.
Do shock tactics in PR really work?

Do shock tactics in PR really work?

We know all too well; the same generic type of careers pages can sometimes fail to engage and attract the best individuals which can result in top-talent going amiss. For many businesses and marketing teams there is the challenge of being tasked to regularly provide informative, creative and attention-grabbing PR campaigns. And while this will often be tailored to certain objectives or showcasing new products which can affect how the campaign is executed – there are still key strategies to bear in mind. Recently we have seen things going awry with big brands under fire for their somewhat suggestive adverts. For example, Heineken being called out for its low-calorie beer advert labelled as “terribly racist” and the question is…could we be seeing a new trend of businesses deliberately choosing to cause uproar and conflict in order to raise their profile in the media and create a stir around their PR campaigns?
How to write a winning award submission

How to write a winning award submission

Entering corporate awards can be a great way to gain exposure, enhance brand perception and validate your market position. However, for each category, there can be only one winner – here’s how you can stand out from the crowd and earn your status as an ‘award winning’ organisation. Choose wisely To be in with a chance of taking home a trophy, you’ll have to invest a hefty chunk of time and resources into collating the information needed. For this reason, taking the decision to enter awards shouldn’t be taken lightly – it has to be worth the effort. Do some research to determine which awards have kudos in your industry and are recognised by your customers – whether that be The Sunday Times’ ‘100 Best Companies to Work For’ or the Concrete Society's Awards for Excellence. For example, we’ve recently been shortlisted for the Recruitment International Supplier Awards in the category of Best Marketing & PR – a hyper-niche category from a brand that our clients are familiar with and trust.
Five simple tactics for increasing your Twitter engagement

Five simple tactics for increasing your Twitter engagement

Is your recruitment firm struggling to get noticed on Twitter? With engagement a major ranking factor in the platform’s algorithm, it is essential that marketers understand how they can maximise this to help meet their objectives. Here are five simple tactics that you can implement into your social media strategy to increase your engagement and visibility on Twitter: 1. Re-use and repurpose your top posts With studies showing that the average lifespan of a tweet lasts between 18-24 minutes, it is important to re-use and repurpose tweets which have received high levels of engagement. This helps maximise the overall reach and, of course, shows that you are posting content that resonates with your audience.
The magic of ‘piggybacking’

The magic of ‘piggybacking’

Jumping on the latest news can be one of the most effective ways to generate content for your recruitment agency. Not only does it show that you are ‘on the ball’ and efficient but also dedicated to the client and their reputation. But in a digital 24/7 world, you have to act fast amongst the rest. Recognising the appetite for pressing subjects and topical events such as International Women’s Day and National Apprenticeship Week are great ways to keep you one step ahead and achieve prime time coverage. So here are some top tips to maintain a rapid smart-proof response to the hot topics and build your brand further with your target audience. 1. Plan your approach While this may seem obvious, monitoring the daily news agenda, spotting opportunities online and staying on top of current events is key to ensuring nothing gets missed. Being aware of important dates and times is also essential to be ready in advance for a related story that might get released last minute. Calendar events such as International Women’s Day are highly celebrated throughout the media and covering the story fast before anyone else is the beauty of preparation, at a time when the press you’re targeting might be looking for comment or writing on the story themselves.
KFC: What can PR professionals learn from the Colonel?

KFC: What can PR professionals learn from the Colonel?

As far as PR challenges go, a chicken shop running out of chicken is a pretty major deal. Which perhaps explains the furore which ensued when KFC was forced to close the majority of its 900 restaurants after bringing a new delivery partner on board. The fiasco was covered extensively across the UK mainstream media, with the most influential outlets from the Sun to the Financial Times offering real-time updates on the situation. Social media, meanwhile, went into overdrive, with fans of the chain demanding, among other things, that the government calls an emergency Cobra meeting over the shortage. Unsurprisingly, rival brands were only too quick to ride the wave of publicity. Burger King offered free food for a year to a customer who told ITV News she was forced to visit the burger joint after finding her favourite chicken shop closed, while Iceland took to giving away frozen chicken strips.
Crisis 101: top tips for dealing with a PR emergency

Crisis 101: top tips for dealing with a PR emergency

Most businesses will find themselves dealing with a difficult public relations event at some point and some may experience a full-blown crisis, such as data theft, cyber-crime or internal malpractice coming to light. In our digital age, news goes viral almost instantaneously, meaning that the implementation of a swift and effective crisis management strategy is essential. The wrong approach can irreversibly damage your brand and its relationship with clients and business partners. One example of a PR disaster is the one which Oxfam currently finds itself experiencing. PR Week says that, “As far as communications crises go, the latest Oxfam scandal has it all: public and media outcry, criticism from corporate partners, and serious questions from parliament and regulators.” Senior figures at the charity paid local prostitutes while on business in Haiti in 2011, which was reported on by The Times. The organisation has been heavily criticised because although it investigated the events at the time, it didn’t disclose them to a number of stakeholders and regulators.
Why the Edelman Trust Barometer means traditional media is more important than ever

Why the Edelman Trust Barometer means traditional media is more important than ever

This year’s Edelman Trust Barometer - which measures trust across a number of institutions, sectors and geographies – reveals that social media companies have lost the trust of the public. In fact only a quarter of the UK population now say that they trust social media as a source of news and information. However there has been a huge increase in trust in traditional media (61%), reaching levels not seen since 2012, as well as a rebound in trust in experts and leaders. So what does this all mean for recruitment marketers? Media coverage matters Well first and foremost, no one is saying that social media isn’t important – it is obviously a fantastic way to broadcast your message – however what is more crucial than ever given Edelman’s research is that the content and messages you are broadcasting have credibility. And how do you get that credibility? One way is through appearing in the press that your target audiences read, trust, and turn to for information. PR is just a cost Despite this, however, many recruitment marketers that are only too eager to get their company featured in the press are prevented from doing so effectively. And it boils down to the same argument we hear time and time again. PR is deemed a cost rather an investment, a vanity project, and something that doesn’t help the business development strategy and deliver leads. The result is that too many agencies shy away from traditional media relations, instead opting for advertorials or nothing at all. So at a time when Edelman’s research clearly demonstrates that media really does matter, how can marketers get press coverage and, crucially, demonstrate its ROI? Getting press coverage…and effectively leveraging it
How will Facebook’s news feed changes affect your recruitment agency?

How will Facebook’s news feed changes affect your recruitment agency?

In the early hours of Friday 12th January, Mark Zuckerberg announced changes to Facebook’s news feed algorithm that will have huge ramifications for every single company that uses the platform. “Recently we've gotten feedback from our community that public content -- posts from businesses, brands and media -- is crowding out the personal moments that lead us to connect more with each other,” Facebook’s co-founder wrote. To combat this, Facebook will be showing less content from businesses, brands and media whilst prioritising ‘meaningful interactions between people’ – in essence returning the platform to its original goal. So, what do these changes mean for marketers at recruitment firms? What we know about the news feed changes so far:
Getting ROI from your PR: A round up from Recruitment Agency Expo

Getting ROI from your PR: A round up from Recruitment Agency Expo

Last week was the annual Recruitment Agency Expo at London Olympia, where recruitment professionals gathered to hear from industry experts, network with peers and get all the latest info on the UK’s staffing sector. Among the many influential speakers stood BlueSky’s very own Managing Director, Tracey Barrett. So for those that missed out, here’s a roundup of Tracey’s presentation on Getting ROI from your PR. Firstly let’s start with the basics, why does PR and marketing really matter in recruitment and why should you bother? As Tracey discussed at the conference, it’s a crowded market out there. Last year alone saw 9,000 start-up agencies, so differentiation is key. Really ask yourself if your company has a USP or are you promoting the same generic selling points that clients and candidates are all too familiar with? An analogy Tracey used was to aim to be that purple cow in the field, and think about whether the value you are adding sets you apart. The value you add could be through market intelligence or thought leadership, but consider how you are going to communicate this.
Top 5 tips for creating engaging content

Top 5 tips for creating engaging content

Most firms understand the importance of having original content such as blogs, company news and professional insights on their websites. Firstly, if visitors to your site discover something useful or interesting, they are more likely to return. Secondly, it allows your firm to position itself as an authority and provider of relevant, engaging information. Finally, quality content gives you more material to share on social media, consequently creating wider exposure.  This is also important as research shows that social shares influence where your website appears in search rankings. So, here are our top five tips for creating material with impact. Establish the audience and purpose Have a clear idea about who you are writing for before you begin. If it is for clients or candidates, what are their pain points and how will the piece address that? Then consider why you are writing it for them. For example, is it to inform them about an emerging issue, explain a complex matter or advise them on an aspect of their career? What will they learn that they didn’t know before? Enlist the help of others A good range of content often has input from more than one person. Involve your consultants as they will sit on lots of information and might have some great ideas about the issues which are affecting clients the most or other interesting topics which you could write about. You could even interview them about their roles and experiences. Also, ask others to comment on and proof read your pieces before uploading them: fresh eyes are always useful.
PR for start-ups: what’s the point?

PR for start-ups: what’s the point?

Make no mistake, getting any fledgling business off the ground is tough, regardless of the founder’s skills, experience and level of dedication. And despite the huge potential rewards associated with setting up your own company, it’s a sad fact that around half of new start-ups fail in the first five years. The recruitment sector is particularly competitive. According to Companies House data, over 9,000 recruitment consultancies set up shop in the UK during 2017. That’s an average of 818 new agencies being registered every single month. Each of these businesses will need to make important decisions around premises, the software and systems they invest in and the service providers they choose, while ensuring they’re compliant and ready and able to trade as quickly as possible. So it’s unsurprising that marketing and PR often drops off the end of the ‘to do’ list.
The top three social media trends to prepare for in 2018

The top three social media trends to prepare for in 2018

Social media dominated the marketing and communications landscape in 2017 - platforms rolled out a host of new features, the number of global social media users exceeded 3 billion for the first time and President Trump cemented his position as the world’s most famous tweeter by using the platform to create a number of international incidents.
All I want for PR 2018 - the good and the bad

All I want for PR 2018 - the good and the bad

New Year, new start and a new world of PR? In the ever changing society we live it can be hard to keep up. But let’s face it, scarily 2018 is fast approaching us and many are unsure of what the New Year might bring. Far from finite, it seems the pace of new innovation is rising at an alarming speed and if we aren’t careful, soon we may find ourselves wading through a haze of advanced technology and myriad of creative innovations for the New Year. But what about PR and marketing? Erring on the side of caution, these sectors like any other will be impacted in some way by the changes for 2018, of course we are looking forward to welcoming these in a positive respect but it can be difficult to narrow down just what the world is anticipating for the months to come. In order to prepare ahead for January and the following months I think it’s time we heard a few PR predictions from the experts (AKA the BlueSky team.) Social media Guru Dan Stobbs gave his thoughts on what to expect for the New Year.
The biggest PR fails of 2017

The biggest PR fails of 2017

So, we are almost in 2018. Depending on the year you’ve had, you may be sad to leave 2017 behind or, quite frankly, be glad to see the back of it. In the PR world, there are definitely some people wishing that they could go a step further and get in a time machine to restart 2017 from scratch. Here are five of the biggest PR fails of 2017.
Blurred lines: Differentiating marketing and PR

Blurred lines: Differentiating marketing and PR

In a world where the lines between advertising, marketing and PR are becoming increasingly blurred, it’s little wonder that some business leaders struggle to see where one function ends and another begins. Add in the role played by social media and it’s easy to see why there’s so much confusion.
How LinkedIn can make you a better PR Person

How LinkedIn can make you a better PR Person

LinkedIn boasts an impressive 500 million users, so surely presents an opportunity for the savvy PR? However, like most social networking sites it’s overcrowded and noisy, making it difficult for anyone to make a real impact. But there are still ways to utilise LinkedIn, for the benefit of both you and your clients. Here are some top tips from the BSE team. Sharing Coverage Every PR person knows that sharing client coverage through your own social media channels is a must to increase visibility. However, it is vital as a PR advisor to encourage your clients to share their coverage on their own social media networks as well. LinkedIn can be more useful than Facebook or Twitter as it’s a professional network, meaning coverage can be seeded into relevant groups.
PRs, if you had one pearl of wisdom – what would it be?

PRs, if you had one pearl of wisdom – what would it be?

Avoiding disaster, navigating networking, and pitching like a pro – what advice would our BlueSky team have for the world of the PR professional? “Don't cut corners on the quality of anything you write,” says Ian Hawkings, Head of our Education Practice. “Every note, email or tweet - both internal and external is a tool that can either help build, or destroy your brand.” It’s something simple that goes a long way, but keeping your writing to the highest standard can get other people to see things the way you’d like them to. Whether that’s proposing a new idea to a client, or getting a journalist to accept your pitch. And Peter Remon, Account Executive here at BlueSky, has some advice when it comes to pitching. “Research exactly which publications are interested in the news you wish to share and, more importantly, which journalists from these publications are writing about it. This does take time, but it is a worthwhile exercise. After all, it is far better to pitch to five relevant journalists than scatter your pitch to 50 journalists who are not.”
Why you should be using the ‘rule of thirds’ in your social media strategy

Why you should be using the ‘rule of thirds’ in your social media strategy

One of the most common dilemmas facing marketers when it comes to producing a social media strategy is deciding on the content mix. What should you be posting? How many job posts is too much? Should you be sharing third-party news? This is where the social media ‘rule of thirds’ comes in. It is a simple model used to ensure that your content is balanced and doesn’t lean too heavily in one direction – after all would you like it if your social media feeds were full of sales posts? By implementing the rule of thirds into your social media strategy you will be able to produce content that is relevant, timely and engaging for your audience. So what exactly are these thirds? And what content should you be posting on your social media channels? One third of your content promotes your agency and converts the audience If someone is following your agency on social media then the chances are they already have an interest in your services and as such you should be promoting these. However, don’t be too ‘salesy’ with these posts – ensure that the amount of promotional content is varied and not too pushy in tone. For example, rather than posting job vacancy after job vacancy, why not simply post a job of the day? Or produce a series of meet the team social media images which introduce your consultants to the wider social media audience? The latter is not only a much more subtle way of promoting your agency’s services but by including a fun fact or two it is more likely to be remembered by a potential client or candidate. One third shares curated content Many marketers can be sceptical about sharing third party content but by getting an understanding of what content your audience consumes and curating it, your recruitment agency’s social media can also become a ‘go to’ for the latest news and insights. To do this you should look at the sector and industry news sites of your audience and see what the biggest stories are that relate to their job roles and what trends could affect them in the future. Curating content also helps demonstrate your agency’s knowledge which can be a major differentiator for both potential clients and candidates.
How diverse is your recruitment firm? #RecruitmentMeansDiversity

How diverse is your recruitment firm? #RecruitmentMeansDiversity

I’m delighted to have been invited to contribute to The Recruitment Network’s new initiative #RecruitmentMeansDiversity which has been designed to shine a spotlight on how the recruitment sector attracts, retains and treats its talent. We are already working closely with The Recruitment Industry Disability Initiative to help to break down the barriers faced by the millions of disabled people who are entering or progressing through the job market and having recently received a highly commended award by ENEI for a diversity and inclusion campaign, it’s an issue close to my heart.
5 tips to make your pitch stand out from the crowd

5 tips to make your pitch stand out from the crowd

Journalist’s jobs are becoming more and more time-pressed, with their inboxes increasingly flooded with PR’s pitches. Now more than ever, for a journalist to buy into a pitch, it needs to capture their attention. But how as a PR can you make your pitch stand out from the crowd ? Make sure it's newsworthy Journalists are inundated with pitches daily, so ones that are boring, uninteresting, and un-newsworthy are destined to fail before they’ve even been sent. ‘The 5 best paints to watch dry’, for example, will never get coverage no matter how amazing your pitch is, or how slow a news week it has been. It is a PR’s responsibility to evaluate whether or not their story is newsworthy before pitching it. Deciding this beforehand stops you from wasting both yours and the journalist’s time, and avoids disappointment when your efforts inevitably fail to deliver results. Have a creative, engaging headline The first part of a pitch that a journalist will read is the headline, and many journalists will decide whether or not they will bother to read on purely based on how interesting that headline is. This is why it is important you pay as much attention to crafting an effective email header as you do to your pitch, as this will encourage the journalist to read more. Make it relevant
Essential steps when a reporter says 'yes'

Essential steps when a reporter says 'yes'

You’ve identified the ingredients for a perfect story, fired off a killer email pitch or picked up the phone and articulated your client’s experience, expertise and angle. The editor or journalist wants to cover the story Result! But where do you go from here? What are the essential steps when a reporter says 'yes'? Be clear on what the publication needs from you It may sound obvious, but be sure that your expectations are aligned. You may have thought that you were setting up an interview, while the commissioning editor had a 1,500 word, Harvard referenced, by-lined article in mind. Make sure you’re both on the same page.
3 stories PRs shouldn’t miss this week

3 stories PRs shouldn’t miss this week

Weinstein and the power of the media Unless you’ve been living under a rock for the last few weeks, you will have heard the Harvey Weinstein story. For obvious reasons, the scandal has been well covered by the media, however in the age of instant news, some people are already bored of it. In fact, I overheard someone in my local coffee shop opening a newspaper and sarcastically saying “oh look, more about Harvey Weinstein, it’s like there’s no other news”. I’m sure there are some PRs who are worried that this story will overshadow their current publicity campaign and others that are working tirelessly to shut down the story and defend Weinstein. Some publications are even using sexualised images of the victims to gain attention, which is not helping the perception of women as objects for male sexual use.
3 reasons why your CEO should be using social media

3 reasons why your CEO should be using social media

Whilst getting social media buy-in for your brand can be a challenging experience, one thing that is often much more difficult is persuading your CEO to create their own social media accounts. Common objections often include being too busy to post on social media, not being digitally savvy enough or not having anything interesting to say. And this attitude is reflected in research from America which has revealed that 60% of Fortune 500 CEOs have no public social media presence. So how can you get them on-board?
How to be an effective media spokesperson

How to be an effective media spokesperson

We’ve all been there. You turn on the TV or open the morning paper only to see a story which is centred around your business sector splashed everywhere. You knew this story was going to hit the headlines months ago – why aren’t you being interviewed along with the other experts? Here are our top tips for becoming an effective media spokesperson: Be visible Becoming a thought leader takes commitment. If a reporter or researcher is looking for insight on GP shortages in rural Essex, for example, the obvious place to begin their search is online. Make a habit of sharing snippets of your expertise and opinions on the news across social media, your own blog and third-party platforms to increase your visibility. We’ve had clients appear on Sky News after TV researchers stumbled across opinionated blog posts. Lay the foundations and the opportunities may just come to you. Be a specialist
Why Twitter’s Move to 280 Characters is a Bad Idea

Why Twitter’s Move to 280 Characters is a Bad Idea

Updates to social media platforms are becoming a far more regular occurrence these days, as the companies behind them roll out various tweaks and new features in an effort to increase the number of active users on their sites. And the last 18 months has already seen three major updates with Instagram emulating Snapchat’s Stories feature, Twitter changing its timeline and Facebook rolling out chatbots for Business Pages. However, it looks like we are about to experience the biggest social media change in years with the news that Twitter has begun trialling a new 280-character limit – double the existing number – with selected users from around the world. This according to Twitter is because users tweeting in languages such as Korean and Chinese are at an advantage over those tweeting in English, for example, as they can convey double the amount of information in one character. http://twitter.com/Twitter/status/912783930431905797
How to use social media for brand building

How to use social media for brand building

Last week I hosted a webinar with BlueSky’s resident social media guru, Dan Stobbs, on our top tips on how to use social media for brand building. And at a time when the number of global users now exceeds 3 billion, it’s perhaps more important than ever that agencies are using the correct platforms to engage with their target audiences. So here are our top five tips for how to use social media for brand building:
How to encourage your employees to share content

How to encourage your employees to share content

On average, employees have 10 times more followers than their company's social media accounts. We recently shared our 10 top tips for social media success. In the post we stressed that encouraging employees to post and share content about your organisation will increase your reach beyond your own channels, while simultaneously building potential leads and brand perception.
Sniffing out a story. Why news sense is important.

Sniffing out a story. Why news sense is important.

Over time many PR professionals or media relations specialists cut their teeth on local papers. And if as a young journalist you didn’t have a news sense it was quickly and often quite ruthlessly drilled into you. Covering court cases and council meetings, doing police and fire calls and covering tough and sometimes horrid assignments became part and parcel of learning the trade – and at the same time all working to high speed deadlines. When the agenda was slack and news was slow, you had to go out and find news. Building contacts and sniffing out a story was essential. You might also have to turn your hand to feature stories, come up with new and innovative ideas, so there was a bank of material for when the paper might have more space.
5 myths about PR

5 myths about PR

Not many people outside of the industry know what PR actually involves. That means that fallacies and myths about PR are bandied around, often by advertising firms worrying about their ever decreasing market share. But what are the top 5 myths about PR? It’s all about the press release A quick search reveals that a worrying number of people think PR actually stands for press release, but it’s so much more than that. Yes, a release is an effective way of getting your brand name out there, but what if you want to establish yourself as a thought leader in your industry? There are myriad options for firms to utilise when diving into the world of PR, the press release is just one of many including white papers, articles, surveys, polls, events and more.
3 social media tips you should ignore

3 social media tips you should ignore

Social media as a communications channel continues to grow, with a recent report undertaken by Hootsuite and We Are Social revealing that the number of people using social media around the world has exceeded 3 billion – increasing at a staggering rate of 1 million new users per day over the last quarter. And with this growth showing no signs of slowing, it is crucial that you are able to cut through this ever-increasing noise to reach your target audiences. However, how do you know if you’re doing this right? A simple Google search on the subject will bring up hundreds of blog posts from self-proclaimed social media ‘experts’, who have given themselves titles such as ‘social media guru’, ‘wizard’ and ‘jedi’, all offering tips that they guarantee will transform your business’s social media. Whilst their advice is often well-intentioned, some of it can do more harm than good. Here are 3 social media tips you should ignore and the reasons why.
In it for the long-haul: why short-term marketing doesn’t work

In it for the long-haul: why short-term marketing doesn’t work

Building a brand takes dedication. As well as a great product or service, you need to invest time and resources into spreading your message. There is no quick fix - success relies on a sustained approach. Short-term marketing initiatives are quite frankly, pointless. Of course, there is a place for dedicated campaigns to promote a time sensitive event or initiative, but this should be contextualised within a programme of ongoing communications. You wouldn’t expect to get fit by visiting the gym once – however hard you pushed yourself during your single visit – so why should the results of PR and communications be any different?
Get more shares for your content on social media

Get more shares for your content on social media

Social media is everywhere in the modern world and if you don’t like it…well, you haven’t got much choice. Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and many others have infiltrated into the modern world and changed it dramatically. For businesses, having a presence on at least one channel is an absolute must and any organisation that doesn’t is likely to be seen as outdated and behind the times in all but the most traditional industries. So it's important to get more shares for your content on social media.
Get much more out of a press release

Get much more out of a press release

When many think of PR, they instantly think ‘press release’. Well, yes they certainly do form part of the public relations mix, but there is so much more and companies need to be looking to get much more out of a press release and make the most of their PR activities. Is it newsworthy? First and foremost, if you are going to put the time and energy into writing a press release, it really must have a news angle. You might consider the fact that you have launched a new website or refurbished your office is fantastic news, but believe me journalists won’t! Think about what there is an appetite for and craft a release based on this. Your target audience is seeking advice and information on subjects that will help them in their day to day job. Think about what data you have access to – salary levels, skills in demand, pooling & pipelining and diversity - and use that to form a release about the market you operate in. This will have far more appeal and position you as an expert in your respective field. Once you have a good, crucially, newsworthy press release, here are my top tips on how you can get much more out of a press release:
Three Simple SEO Tips for Recruitment Agencies

Three Simple SEO Tips for Recruitment Agencies

Search engine optimisation (SEO) is often seen as a daunting and complicated subject. However, it needn’t be that way. Here are three SEO tips for recruitment agencies of all sizes that can be used to increase search rankings:   Research your keywords Although obvious to some, keyword research is often overlooked due to factors such as time constraints. The easiest way to research potential keywords for your content is to create a keyword list by using Google’s autocomplete function. To do this, simply open Google.co.uk and start typing the subject of your page in the search box and you will see a selection of the most frequently used search queries pop up. You can take your research one step further and build a more detailed list by starting the next word after your topic with every letter of the alphabet and seeing what queries appear.  
Seven top tips to sharpen your PR writing

Seven top tips to sharpen your PR writing

I recently blogged on why PR professionals are unlikely to be replaced by robots in the near future. One of the reasons why is the human ability to craft copy to create impact at a time when content can no longer demand attention.   Here are my seven top tips to sharpen your PR writing:   Get to the point quickly   Whether you’re drafting a pitch, press release or article, ensure that your intended message is clear from the outset, or you’ll swiftly lose your audience.   Cover all bases   PR professionals should always attempt to answer the ‘who’, ‘what’, ‘where’, ‘when’ and ‘why’ in the first sentence or paragraph of every piece they draft in the interest of brevity.
PR or Advertising?

PR or Advertising?

It’s the age-old struggle. In the left corner we have advertising, represented by Mad Men, while in the right we have PR, represented by Absolutely Fabulous. Obviously, in my eyes there’s one clear winner, however it’s probably fair to say that I’m ever so slightly biased. But what is more powerful, PR or advertising?     Dated concept It would be unfair to say that advertising doesn’t have its place in the modern world, however to most commentators it’s seen as less effective than it once was in the past. If we rewound to even as recently as 20 years ago, advertising was still a powerful platform and was used to drive the consumer behaviour that organisations wanted. However, back then it was easier to convince buyers to do what you want and it would be fair to say that people were less savvy and, quite possibly, less cynical. Now in the modern, hardened, social media-led world it’s easy to see through often transparent campaigns, which can have damaging effects on firms.
5 Ingredients for a successful story

5 Ingredients for a successful story

Not all news is news.
How to write a press release

How to write a press release

A press release is the most basic and most important tool for communicating with the media. Why? Simply because journalists and editors have become used to them and know how to deal with them or, in the majority of cases, how to delete them from their inbox.   So, how do you write a press release? A good press release encapsulates a story to gain media attention – a bit like a good mailshot in the recruitment sector. As with a mailshot it needs to be targeted, be relevant and communicate quickly and clearly. Here’s an example of one we did for a client which ended up getting both domestic and international coverage over the course of a whole year:  
10 tips for social media success

10 tips for social media success

Our new social media executive   Hi, I’m Dan and I’m a new addition to BlueSky PR. I’ve joined the team as social media executive to help develop our clients’ social media presences on the recruitment, HR and talent management side of the business. Up until now, my career has seen me spend almost four years in the not-for-profit sector where I worked for two children’s charities on a national and international scale. These were varied roles which saw me assume responsibility for marketing activities, including brand development, press releases and social media management. I’m really excited to start working with my colleagues to help our clients take their social media activity to the next level. I live in Hemel Hempstead and enjoy long walks along the canal, watching tennis and football (I’m a huge Liverpool fan!), and listening to a wide range of music.  
The General Election and other great sources for content ideas

The General Election and other great sources for content ideas

6 great sources for generating content   1.      Your recruitment consultants   They talk to candidates and clients on the phone every day.  They will certainly have some quirky human-interest stories – they type of thing that they may not even realise is content but actually makes a really interesting story.   They are talking to clients about trends in the market; they are talking to candidates about salaries – so use your people.   They are also having questions asked of them by clients and candidates, so they know what kind of information is being sought and what there is an appetite for.   2.      Databases   Your database is full of information in terms of salaries etc.   Think about how you can get some good data by segmenting the details you hold about your network of contacts.  Journalists love data!   You can look at salaries or whether there is a particular regional demand for certain types of jobs / skills.  If you work across different regions of the UK – or internationally – you can do regional / country comparisons using your database.
Getting ROI from your PR

Getting ROI from your PR

PR absolutely can and absolutely should be measured.   Know what your objectives are.  You need to have something to measure against – and so you need context. Do you need more candidates or clients – and where? In a particular sector or geography. Do you need more people to work for you? Do you want to raise you profile as a thought leader?   Don’t just share the same message across all channels, think about what you are looking to achieve and the best way to do this using each channel.  
How to measure the success of a PR campaign

How to measure the success of a PR campaign

One of the major gripes that many people have with PR is that it has historically been seen as overly fluffy and often challenging to prove a direct return on investment. For the financial professionals amongst you, that’s probably the number one thing you look for when investing in a service and admittedly, it has been one of the industry’s biggest weaknesses. Historically, the field has been more about creating positive sentiment and raising brand awareness rather than proving direct and measureable financial return from your PR investment.  So, how do you measure the success of PR?
Why PR professionals won’t be replaced with robots

Why PR professionals won’t be replaced with robots

A new report from PwC suggests that robotics and artificial intelligence could affect almost a third of UK jobs by the 2030s. However, while the rise of technology is increasing impacting the way that organisations hire - PR professionals won’t be replaced by robots.   A recent blog on PR Daily highlights the four crucial skills that PR professionals will always need (and our blog post last week discusses the skills a PR professional would be unsuccessful without). These are writing, research, project management and presentation.  
What does your picture say? Why choosing the right image is so important

What does your picture say? Why choosing the right image is so important

This post was originally published 23/01/2014 but after revamping the images we share via social media alongside our content this week, it occurred to me that it's perhaps even more relevant today.   A picture is worth a thousand words – that old cliché just won’t sink beneath the myriad of professional advice It’s the idea that a still image (or perhaps video lasting a few seconds) can convey ideas and emotions that would take streams of words. And it may be a well-worn saying but, the fact remains, a well-chosen picture can really boost well-written text.   There’s the classic argument that images in printed media, like newspapers and magazines, draw the reader’s eye to an article. Yet, in today’s world, it’s not just printed media that we have to think about. If we look at social media, on Pinterest in particular, you simply can’t pin a webpage that doesn’t feature an image – so if your article or blogpost doesn’t have a picture it won’t be going on your, or anyone else’s, boards (or look at Instagram where it's all about the image and the status that goes alongside is almost inconsequential - well except for the hashtags). In this case, there’s absolutely no chance that someone will stumble across an interesting Pin and it will lead to your page. It’s cutting off a slice of a tech-savvy potential audience, and there are over 150 million users on Pinterest alone.  
The biggest threats to recruiters

The biggest threats to recruiters

We recently surveyed recruitment directors to find out what's keeping them awake at night.  It turns out their biggest fear is the threat both internal recruiters and RPOs present to their market share.
Recruitment PR and Marketing Tips

Recruitment PR and Marketing Tips

I recently ran another hugely successful edition of our fantastic recruitment marketing masterclass with the lovely Lisa Jones of Barclay Jones.  After the session Lisa and I caught up to put together a list of our top recruitment marketing tips for email marketing success. If you're interested in attending our next session in September you can register now.   I've also been talking a lot recently about how to get ROI from your recruitment marketing, at Recruitment Leaders Connect, in Only Marketing Jobs, in Recruitment Grapevine, and in a hugely popular webinar with APSCo where over 80% of attendees said they weren't confident that their PR and marketing activities were being measured effectively.  
The value of PR and content for recruiters

The value of PR and content for recruiters

BlueSky PR’s Tracey Barrett recently presented at the Recruitment Leaders Connect conference on “How to make money from PR,” followed by an afternoon of roundtables where we discussed the value of PR and content.   So what did we discuss?   Why aren’t more recruiters appearing in the press?   Often the answer was that they hadn’t been asked and don’t know how to approach the press themselves.  But pitching a journalist a story is no different than pitching a client a candidate – the worst they can say is no.   However, one of the key things we discussed that that PR isn’t just about the press   The press can be a good credibility tick because someone else is writing about you rather than writing about yourself – but everyone can become a publisher these days when we have access to blogging platforms and LinkedIn publisher.  So if you’re an organisation that doesn’t have the comfort of a marketing person to represent you to the press on your behalf, you can start just by publishing some posts yourself. It can be as simple as using your LinkedIn publisher platform to start sharing your opinions to stir up some comment and controversy.  
Top tips for effective content marketing

Top tips for effective content marketing

I was kindly asked to take part in UK Recruiter’s latest live webchat on content marketing for recruiters. A few technical blips from my end meant it didn’t really go according to plan – so for those of you who are interested in how to create effective content marketing here are my top tips:   Have a strategy It’s essential to determine who you want your content to reach and what the objectives are. Do you want more candidates, clients or even staff for your own business? Do you want to build up talent pools that you can demonstrate your expertise to and tap into for future opportunities?  Establishing this will enable you to tailor your content to each specific audience ensuring it is relevant. A strategy will also help dictate what type of content – whether it be blogs, videos, or infographics – are appropriate for each.