POSTED BY Peter Remon

How to effectively work with media in the US

How to effectively work with media in the US

With a population of just over 329 million people, making it the third most populous country in the world, the USA is clearly going to be a key media target for any institution. But, more importantly, according to GMAC’s 2018 Applications Trends survey, 140,000 out of an overall 290,000 business school applications last year came from US-based applicants – over three times the size of applicants in Europe alone.
Is traditional public relations redundant in modern politics?

Is traditional public relations redundant in modern politics?

Public image and politics have always gone hand in hand. Think JFK ensuring he looked as sharp as possible in the 1960 presidential TV debates in which he overwhelming beat his opposition, Richard Nixon. Think Margaret Thatcher before her election in 1979, taking lessons with a speech coach to help lower her pitch and develop a calm, authoritative tone. Think Tony Blair, in 1994, hiring Alistair Campbellas his press secretary and spokesperson for the Labour party. All of these are examples of politicians taking steps to try and shape and control their own public image.
How to ensure your content has as much impact as possible

How to ensure your content has as much impact as possible

There are no two ways about it, creating great, insightful content for your institution is always a good thing. However, it is extremely difficult to measure how much of real impact each piece of content actually has on the reader and whether or not this has a long-lasting effect.
International PR offices – are they really needed to get international coverage?

International PR offices – are they really needed to get international coverage?

You’re looking for a PR firm to help out with your international PR efforts and come across a firm that states “we have offices based in New York, London, Hong Kong, Paris and Berlin, in order to penetrate our key markets in the most effective way possible”.
BlueSky Education’s Key Topics of 2018

BlueSky Education’s Key Topics of 2018

As we enter 2019, now seems a better time than any to look back over the previous year and some of its key themes for business schools. Working with schools across 10 different countries, BlueSky Education naturally has an abundance of professors who have a lot to say on a wide range of topics. In fact, in 2018 alone BlueSky Education delivered over 1,000 pieces of unique coverage for its clients across a whole host of areas, in international, national and trade publications. Let’s take a look at three of the top themes which featured the prominently in BlueSky Education’s coverage this year: Artificial Intelligence (AI) Despite the actual nuts and bolts of how it operates being unbeknown to most, AI still managed to be a topic which dominated much of the news agenda in 2018. Whether it be the world’s first AI news anchor unveiled in China, the launch of Uber’s driverless cars or the Robot Football World Cup in the summer, the topic of AI was something that was on the lips of many this year. The discussion around AI is one that many of BlueSky education’s clients also contributed to, with over 40 pieces of coverage being focused on this topic, including this piece on Uber’s partnership with one of our clients, Ecole Polytechnique, in a bid to create flying taxis, which featured in The Guardian, BBC and CNN. Or this piece of research from a professor at one of our clients, BI Norwegian Business School, which showed how emerging economies were more open to AI for business management purposes, which featured in Forbes. Gender diversity
How do you differentiate your business school from others in a crowded market?

How do you differentiate your business school from others in a crowded market?

In November, I had the pleasure of hearing from and spending time with representatives from some of Europe’s best and well-known business schools, at the GMAC European Conference in Berlin.
Why PR shouldn’t be judged by the volume of coverage

Why PR shouldn’t be judged by the volume of coverage

When reporting back to your clients or manager, would you rather show them 20 individual pieces of PR coverage you’ve gained, or five? Naturally, you’re always going to say 20. The more coverage you gain for a client or business the better surely? It’s just more evidence of your value and more proof that their money is being well spent on PR, isn’t it?
What can PR’s learn from England’s media strategy?

What can PR’s learn from England’s media strategy?

Rewind two years to a warm summer’s night in France, England have just suffered arguably their biggest humiliation at a football tournament, losing 2-1 to Iceland, a country with just over 300,000 population. Headlines across the nation read ‘national disgrace’, ‘not fit to wear the shirt’ and so on. The distance between the England national football team and the media and general public could not be further. Fast forward to 2018, the scene could not be more different. A new manager and a new-look team which came so close to reaching a World Cup final. But, more extraordinary from a PR perspective – a team that is no longer at war with the media and is in fact actively supported by it and the general public. However, this is not just because the team has played well. When Gareth Southgate entered the job as manager, he decided that none of the departments at the England camp were fit-for-purpose and needed a complete overhaul. He decided to start these departments again completely from scratch, including the England’s communications department. A new-look openness and honesty within the team has been welcomed by the media. This is something PR’s could learn from. Too often PR’s are stereotypically seen as dishonest – England’s communication strategy proves that openness and honesty with journalists is what they value and is likely to gain the best results. Now, we are in an era where the media demands transparency, and PR’s who are open with journalists are likely to have a better reputation with them and be seen as genuine and approachable, which will only work in their favour in the future. This new look strategy has seen journalists and the England football team also bond on a personal level, like never before. We have seen videos of journalists and players having games of darts against each other, for instance. This personal bonding has been a great way for journalists and the team to network and connect with each other on a level outside of work. PR’s could learn to do this more in their job and take the opportunity to try bond with journalists and go the extra mile for them to ensure that in the future these journalists know who they are and have a good relationship them, helping them to look more favourably upon PR’s and their companies in the future. The England team have done their best to accommodate journalists, with regular media conferences, better access to the players and media days where journalists can speak to as many team members as they want. The exclusivity that the England team have offered has allowed the players and journalists to work as a team to produce great stories and content. The positive stories we have seen in the press and positive public image of the team are not just down to the team’s success. It has proven that when PR’s are extremely accommodating to journalists and work together as a team, the best stories and content is produced.
How to utilise social media to gain greater exposure for your client’s coverage

How to utilise social media to gain greater exposure for your client’s coverage

Social media is a great platform to share and gain greater exposure for your client coverage. However, many people are mistaken into thinking that simply posting a link to this coverage is enough to entice people to click the link and view the content. In a generation where people are seeking the quickest, most engaging and informative stories, a simple link with no extra added content is not enough to convince people to view your coverage. Here are a few tips on how to form your social media posts so that your client coverage gets the best exposure possible: Include insightful comment Including thought-provoking and insightful quotes from your coverage in your post will encourage more people to click on and read your client’s coverage. The quotes will act as a teaser for those who are interested in the subject and give them a short snippet of what to expect from the piece, encouraging them to read the article for more. Use relevant hash tags Including hashtags which are relevant to the articles subject area in your post will gain greater exposure within its specific targeted audience. The likelihood is that your own personal social media accounts do not have a large, specific following of all the subject areas that your clients gain media coverage within - adding these hashtags will make your content more accessible to those who it is targeted at. Encourage discussion Posting a link to your coverage and including a call to action such as asking for thoughts and comments from other social media users will not only encourage more people to read the article, but also encourage interaction from them joining in with the discussion and getting people talking about your clients. Tag relevant people Tagging the relevant social media accounts, such as your client and the news outlet which your coverage appears in, will directly inform them of the coverage and encourage them to both interact with it and share it. This will expose the coverage to a much larger and diverse audience, thus gaining it a greater readership.
How PRs should use Twitter as a professional tool

How PRs should use Twitter as a professional tool

Social media platform Twitter boasts over 330 million global users, and has quickly become the go to site for journalists, PRs and the general population, to view and share news. With around three quarters of journalists using Twitter every day and over 70% of them stating that Twitter is a valuable professional tool, it harnesses the potential to be a great platform for PRs to utilise, to the benefit of themselves and their clients. However, with around 500 million tweets sent every day, it can be hard for PRs to really stand out from the crowd, and reap the full benefits of the social media platform. So, here are a few simple tips on how a PR professional should utilise Twitter. Follow and engage with relevant journalists With the majority of journalists regularly active on Twitter, it is the perfect place to connect with them – simply by engaging with their content. This is a great way to build a personal relationship with a journalist, by liking, replying and sharing your opinion on their tweets. This will strengthen the relationship between you and a journalist, making you more memorable - which is likely to make them look more favourably upon any stories and ideas that you decide to pitch to them.
How to use news trends to gain great coverage for your clients

How to use news trends to gain great coverage for your clients

As 2017 comes to a close, you’d be forgiven for thinking the only significant (or fake!!) news stories this year have involved the Brexit negotiations and Donald Trump. However, if you look a little closer, or have somehow managed to block the words ‘Brexit’ and ‘Trump’ from appearing on your phone (please let me know how!), there has been a number of other news stories on the agenda in 2017 – each of which has provided opportunities for the savvy PR operator. So as the year comes to an end, here are just some examples of how to use news trends and how BlueSky earned great coverage for our clients. Gender pay gap In July, the BBC succumbed to pressure and revealed the salaries of its biggest stars. In doing so they highlighted again, the substantial gender pay gap that exists in most organisations, with the highest paid male, Chris Evans (no, I’m not sure why he gets paid so much either), earning almost 400% more than the highest paid female. The report created a trend of news stories focusing on gender in the workplace and equal pay, which even persuaded the UK government to order all large firms to publish their own salary figures. This provided BlueSky with an opportunity to promote research from one of our clients, which found that women scored higher than men in four out of five leadership skill categories, making them better leaders. Not only was this research highly relevant, but it helped to further the discussion on why the gender pay gap exists. Our press release received coverage in over 40 different publications, including The Times and The Metro. Artificial Intelligence (AI) and robotics
5 tips to make your pitch stand out from the crowd

5 tips to make your pitch stand out from the crowd

Journalist’s jobs are becoming more and more time-pressed, with their inboxes increasingly flooded with PR’s pitches. Now more than ever, for a journalist to buy into a pitch, it needs to capture their attention. But how as a PR can you make your pitch stand out from the crowd ? Make sure it's newsworthy Journalists are inundated with pitches daily, so ones that are boring, uninteresting, and un-newsworthy are destined to fail before they’ve even been sent. ‘The 5 best paints to watch dry’, for example, will never get coverage no matter how amazing your pitch is, or how slow a news week it has been. It is a PR’s responsibility to evaluate whether or not their story is newsworthy before pitching it. Deciding this beforehand stops you from wasting both yours and the journalist’s time, and avoids disappointment when your efforts inevitably fail to deliver results. Have a creative, engaging headline The first part of a pitch that a journalist will read is the headline, and many journalists will decide whether or not they will bother to read on purely based on how interesting that headline is. This is why it is important you pay as much attention to crafting an effective email header as you do to your pitch, as this will encourage the journalist to read more. Make it relevant You could write the most amazing pitch in the world, but if it isn’t pitched to the right publication, it will never be read. For instance, a pitch about a world-changing bacon product that actually makes you lose weight (if only!!), will never be read if you’re pitching it to ‘The Vegetarian News’. Of course this is an extreme example, however it has its relevance. It is important that, as a PR, you research exactly which publications are interested in the news you wish to share and, more importantly, which journalists from these publications are writing about it. This does take time, but it is a worthwhile exercise. After all, it is far better to pitch to five relevant journalists than scatter your pitch to 50 journalists who are not. Make it short and snappy Journalists barely have time in their day to open all their e-mails, let alone read them thoroughly. So, what makes you think they will have time to read your pitch, which is as long as a thesis? You must make your pitch short, snappy and to the point, summarising the story and ensuring the journalist can fully understand its significance. Cut out all of the unnecessary information – a journalist will not want to read waffle. It is important to ensure that every single word in your pitch is carefully selected leaving the journalist wanting to know more. A pitch should be like a wine tasting, the journalist should have a small glass, and want to come back to you for the whole bottle. Do not oversell