BlueSky PR Blog

Why you should follow your dream into PR

Why you should follow your dream into PR

The key to career happiness is to follow your childhood dream, new research has revealed.
What a month in the BlueSky Education team has taught me about PR

What a month in the BlueSky Education team has taught me about PR

I’ve been with the BlueSky education team for just over a month now, and it has been a learning experience to say the least. Coming straight out of university, in which I studied a pretty non-specific degree (History), I didn’t really know much about PR – especially Business School PR.
Introducing Jonny Stone

Introducing Jonny Stone

I’m Jonny Stone, and I’m leaving History in the past and looking forward to a new exciting career in public relations –
Journalism to PR

Journalism to PR

I was adamant when I was 18 that journalism was the career for me. I absolutely love writing and had a keen interest in current affairs and journalism combined these two.
Introducing Kyle Grizzell

Introducing Kyle Grizzell

Since graduating, I have spun around in the world of recent graduate life as violently as I could have, frantically flitting from one career area to the next trying to find my ‘passion.’
Why you should address mental health in the workplace

Why you should address mental health in the workplace

In honour of mental health awareness week, we at BlueSky are keen to raise awareness around the common - but perhaps not as sufficiently discussed - issue of mental health at work - and why it’s vital that businesses today address this.
Introducing Olivia Nieberg

Introducing Olivia Nieberg

Having finished university with a degree in Politics & International Relations from the University of Manchester in 2015, my career path following graduation has been somewhat varied to say the least.
A look back at BlueSky Education in photos

A look back at BlueSky Education in photos

As BlueSky Education approaches its tenth year, we take a look back at some of the greatest moments we’ve captured on camera in the last decade.
A new member of the BlueSky PR team: Fahida Begum

A new member of the BlueSky PR team: Fahida Begum

Hello everyone, I’m Fahida, the newest member of the BlueSky PR team! I have joined the crew as a content writer and I’m very much looking forward to getting stuck in! A passion for writing What lead me through the BlueSky PR doors is the same thing that lead me to study journalism at college and university: my passion for writing, media and researching everything. I’ve always known that I’d like a job that involves working with the press, building rapport and that encourages me to be creative. That makes being a content writer for PR quite a compatible option! During my degree I studied a variety of modules from science and the environment to arts and culture, religion and politics. I loved the process of researching these topics and turning them into newsworthy pieces of journalism that are informative and hopefully entertaining too. Outside of university, I volunteered at local radio station Reprezent Radio as a broadcast producer, which landed me in some exciting opportunities such as filming for BBC Asian Network!
Does Feminism have a PR problem?

Does Feminism have a PR problem?

I am proud to call myself a feminist. And by feminist, I mean I believe in equality between genders – there’s no bra-burning, man-hating, tunnel vision going on here – just a simple desire for a level playing field.

Why Guy Fawkes’ flame won’t go out

The 5th November marks the 413th anniversary of the failure of the 1605 Gunpowder Plot to blow up the Houses of Parliament. Led by Robert Catesby, this group of Roman Catholic activists had suffered persecution during the 45 years of Queen Elizabeth’s reign. Against all their hopes, Protestant King James I ascended to the throne and declared that Catholics were still not free to practice their religion. So, the plotters laced a cellar in the House of Lords with gunpowder but were rumbled last minute when Guy Fawkes was caught red-handed by a group of guards. He was tortured for information and only narrowly escaped being drawn and quartered alive by leaping off the gallows and breaking his own neck – grisly stuff. Fawkes became a symbol of disobedience and when the 5th November was granted as a national holiday by the King – during which church attendance was compulsory – effigies of Guy were thrown into huge bonfires to condemn his treason.
Why I decided on a career in PR

Why I decided on a career in PR

Hi there, my name’s Jake and I’ve recently become a member of the BlueSky team! If you had asked me what I wanted to do when I was a child, I’d probably have responded by telling you I was going to be a footballer, rapper or actor. PR was definitely not on my radar. However, as I realised I couldn’t run with a ball, rap or act, I was forced to look elsewhere. In hindsight, I think the skills needed for a career in PR have been with me for a long time. I’ve always been an avid reader and writer and the opportunity to channel that into a career is something that appealed to me very much. After an exciting and intense 4 years at Manchester University studying English Literature, I began working in business development, probably because I needed a break from reading and writing! I learnt a lot from the experience, however, as time went on, I found that my brain was beginning to melt, and the urge to use my writing and communication skills returned with a vengeance.
How Generation Z will change the face of PR

How Generation Z will change the face of PR

As Russian tourists flock to Salisbury Cathedral and Theresa May accidentally summons ancient demons with her dance moves, the oldest Millennials begin to turn 40. It’s an absurd time to be alive.
Why I chose PR

Why I chose PR

‘So what are you going to do with your life?’ asks your least favourite relative, two days after graduation. This was the question I dreaded as a student. Pursuing an English Literature degree had its advantages; I got to hone my writing skills, think creatively and do a lot of independent research. However, career direction was definitely not one of the assets of the course. As a result I was faced with going into the big wide world with essentially no idea what I was going to do with myself.

Three Reasons I Chose a Career in PR

Okay so a career in public relations might not be as glamorous as Samantha Jones in Sex and the City makes out, however I’ve come to learn that there is so much more to PR than planning parties. Below I have summarised the top three reasons I love my job as a PR person.
The most annoying misconceptions about PR

The most annoying misconceptions about PR

Most people don’t understand what public relations is. Part of the problem is that it varies so much across different industries – from working in product PR and sending out samples, to organising huge launch events, to sticking your head inside a research paper and condensing it into a press release – it’s all PR. The purpose is pretty much always to promote something or someone, raise the profile, get seen, be talked about. To this day – and despite half a decade at this very agency – my parents still aren’t totally sure what I do. “The stereotypical “PR? Oh, so you just push out press releases then?” or the equally demeaning “PRs spend their time lunching, getting drunk and talking b*ll*cks” perspective,” is something that particularly irritates our Head of Practice, Kerry Ruffle. “Yes, PRs will distribute press releases, but it’s only a small part of a job which takes a great deal more creativity and forethought to do with any degree of success. “A press release, when written intelligently and used correctly,” she says, “is still an incredibly powerful tool. The problem is too many misinformed, time-pressed or plain lazy media professionals do not take the necessary time to write a release which considers who the intended audience is and what information would be most relevant to them, set it out clearly and concisely and, finally, actually send it to the right people!” As for going out and getting drunk all the time – if that’s true then we’re doing it wrong! Sophie O’Sullivan, Account Executive here at BlueSky, agrees. “A popular misconception is that PR provides a glamorous lifestyle consisting of no real work - only attending events and partying. Stereotypes like this have come into people’s consciousness because of characters such as Samantha Jones in Sex and the City, a PR who stated that, ‘’I don’t believe in the Republican party or the Democratic Party, I just believe in parties.’’ It's an opinion that’s rife among many of those who speak to our team. Kate Mowbray, Senior Account Executive, has had people think that she just goes to events and hands out free products to bribe journalists. Peter Remon, also a Senior Account Executive on the team, has had to battle the suggestion that PR is all about social media and he spends the whole day using Twitter. Really though? We spend our time interviewing fascinating alumni and pitching their stories of success, from setting up companies worth millions to changing whole industries. We dive into complicated research papers and craft short, sharp press releases. We arrange meetings with journalists all around the world, from Sydney to Singapore. We help target markets for student recruitment. We develop effective social media strategies. We offer expert advice on the business education landscape, and so much more.

How my degree prepared me for my role here at BlueSky PR

I studied English and Linguistics at Nottingham Trent University and my time at university is something I will never forget. Although cliché, I had an excellent time – growing both academically and personally throughout the three years. Although these subjects are certainly not a prerequisite for a career in PR, it does equip you with transferable skills which are key to being successful.

Is it cool to be kind in PR?

Hard-nosed, cut-throat consultants. Thick-skinned, full of false charm and selfish arrogance. Is that what you think of when you imagine a PR professional? Do you picture PR agency directors barking orders and waiting for hot coffee from shaking interns? I hope not because, personally, I think it’s rather cool to be kind in this industry. Perhaps it’s my Millennial attitudes surfacing. I’m all for doing good by people. I want to work for people who care about me and I want my colleagues – as well as my clients – to know I genuinely care about them. After all, I have only seen it produce positive results. If you know that you are valued and feel like you can make a difference to someone’s day, then you simply perform better. It’s about making that extra effort to pitch until there’s a ‘yes’, to research a country’s media until you understand it’s entire landscape, or to get up extra early to speak to someone in another time zone. Those are the actions of hardworking teams who want to achieve excellent outcomes – and it can be nurtured by kindness. By listening to everyone’s ideas, by creating a space where you don’t feel as though your job is on the line because the traffic was bad and you were five minutes late. Despite our sector’s somewhat harsh reputation, kindness is a feeling that’s woven into our culture here at BlueSky Education.

Our new intern: Sophie O'Sullivan

The inevitable question people ask when you tell them you’re studying for a degree in English and Linguistics is: ‘So, are you going to be a teacher?’
PR is an art, not a science

PR is an art, not a science

I’ve previously written on the reasons why I believe that PR professionals won’t be replaced by robots, and it seems that recent research from the Chartered Institute of Public Relations (CIPR) confirms my suspicions.

Kanye West, the connoisseur of disastrous PR 

As one of the 51.9 million following Donald Trump on Twitter, his April exchange with Kanye West left me baffled – and not just at the meaning of ‘We are both dragon energy’. 
How to build a perfectly performing PR team through personality

How to build a perfectly performing PR team through personality

Are you demanding and competitive, or patient and relaxed? Cautious and formal, or sociable and enthusiastic? Even if they are opposites, all of these traits are positive – so bringing these personalities together can make the most impressively effective PR teams. But how can you do it in your own company? Take a look at ‘Insights Discovery’ to see how people have dominant characteristics. It’ll group personalities into Cool Blue, Fiery Red, Earth Green, and Sunshine Yellow. We are all unique combinations of these colours. This psychology tool helps to understand strengths and weaknesses, communication style, approach to problems, and value to the team. By building teams with people spread across these personality types, you’re more likely to create high-performing groups. While people don’t fit perfectly into a segment, it’s easy to see what traits they are lead by. I’d say that I was largely Fiery Red – being rather strong-willed and purposeful – with a good dose of both Sunshine Yellow and Earth Green. When I look at other members of the BlueSky team, it’s easy to pick up and admire Kerry’s Cool Blue characteristics of precision and logic, Peter’s Earth Green traits of patience and relaxation, and Kate’s Sunshine Yellow qualities of enthusiasm and spontaneity. Bringing these individual traits together here at BlueSky have built a strong, productive team. With our differences come rounded decisions, considerate teamwork, and a broad focus. While those of the team who lean towards Cool Blue might tend to focus on problem-solving, the Fiery Red workers look to results, Sunshine Yellow focuses on interactions, and Earth Green looks to maintain harmony. It’s simple to see why it works.
The H&M nightmare

The H&M nightmare

Unless you’ve been hidden under a rock for the past week you’ll have heard of H&M’s recent marketing campaign which saw a young black child wearing a hoodie which reads ‘coolest monkey in the jungle’. And in the days since the backlash has been huge – not only has the fashion brand lost celebrity endorsers, but huge swathes of customers have also pledged to boycott the business. The H&M fiasco is not the first time a global brand has come under fire for seemingly racist campaigns. It was only recently that Pepsi was widely criticised for its ad showing Kendall Jenner appearing to end racial tensions with a simple gesture – offering a can of Pepsi to a police officer! So what’s going wrong for these brands which have colossal marketing and PR teams behind them in order to prevent such disasters? Outrage marketing Many believe that what we are seeing is simply an example of outrage marketing – a deliberate campaign to anger people which creates a buzz around a particular brand. And if that was the intention it can’t be disputed that it has worked – the company has been trending online and everyone is talking about it. And while the general sentiment towards H&M is negative, the brand is certainly in the spotlight. It remains to be seen whether the saying ‘there’s no such thing as bad publicity’ rings true in this instance.

Following a passion

Hello all, my name is Zahra and having recently graduated last year, I am Bluesky’s newest recruit! To give a brief background, from a young age, the theme of career and what I would pursue had always been at the forefront. When it comes to the taboo on career paths and pressure to succeed, there are many reasons we factor in. They often say it’s never too late to follow your passion and to choose something important to you. If you pick something you enjoy you will only work harder to achieve and excel, which is why I knew PR was right for me. Before embarking in the working world, I attended Manchester University where I lived and breathed the vibrant student lifestyle for three years studying criminology. Although not the most common of degrees, the syllabus uncovered the world of people, psychology, politics and artificial intelligence, encouraging me to debate, and analyse the world from a criminal justice and political point of view. Although somewhat daunting at first, having experienced a truly adventurous, productive (and sometimes chaotic) year working in public sector recruitment, I soon realised that I wanted to pursue what I have always appreciated. A job which offers the chance to write, opting for creativity over calls, to be motivated in a role by exploring news, companies and media whilst discussing and researching the ever changing society we live in. Despite being new to the team, any nerves were instantly dissolved by the warm welcome and genial response I have received. Having worked as a consultant taught me valuable lessons and the skills I gained I hope to utilise further in PR and communications.

A new member of the BlueSky team: Helen Edmundson

Hello, I’m Helen, a new recruit to the BlueSky team and a career changer. After graduating with a degree in English Literature, I spent the last fifteen years as a Teacher of English, working my way up until I became a Head of Department. The fields of English teaching and Public Relations may seem fairly disparate to many but they share a lot of common ground. One important skill that you develop as a teacher is the ability to take what can often be complex specialised material and find a way to make that interesting and accessible to a - not necessarily captive - audience. You need to be able to speak and write in a way that is engaging and has impact, otherwise you will lose your audience faster than you can say, ‘Time to pack up!’
A new member of the BlueSky team: Kate Mowbray

A new member of the BlueSky team: Kate Mowbray

Back to school I still remember how I felt when I went to big school for the first time.
A new member of the BlueSky team: Peter Remon

A new member of the BlueSky team: Peter Remon

Starting a new job felt eerily similar to my first day at university The early starts, the meeting new people, the opportunity to learn new things. However, this time it was all without a fresher’s week before-hand sadly.
Buzzwords: The most productive meeting in the world

Buzzwords: The most productive meeting in the world

‘You know what will make our meeting more productive? Buzzwords!’ exclaimed the millennial, accustomed to throwing disruptive innovation around the boardroom.   ‘Buzzwords??’ cried the Generation X, lean leadership guru as he planned his exit strategy.   Tracey, MD of BlueSky PR, agreed with this 110%. She thought it was quite a unique idea. Not totally unique, you understand, just a bit.   ‘Well let’s just be clear about one thing…” started Chris Johnson.   But before he could finish his thought process, Kerry had shelved his discussion. ‘I think the really important point is that we touch base on how to leverage buzzwords to their best effect.’   ‘GAME-CHANGER!!’ cried Steph Mullins. She always overused that phrase.   ‘This is hardly a game,’ commented Steph King, who instinctively distrusted ballpark figures.   Ian wanted to contribute, but he had run so far up the flagpole that he was struggling to circle back.   Adrian, the voice of reason, having to shout a little for Ian, chose this moment to ask a very valid question. It was a no-brainer, really. ‘So, at this moment in time, I just wanted to check that everyone is going forward. Because I’m not sure our diversity framework covers Time Lords.’   Over in the corner, Belinda was pouring herself a strong and stable drink.  

A career in PR would be unsuccessful without….

Pinning down the exact qualities that make someone a success in PR is a hard task. Some bloggers don’t bother to delve deeper than the obvious; organised, good communicator, able to multitask. But I’m not sure that goes very far in demonstrating why you would be a great PR, rather than just a good employee, or the PR skills you have to offer.   Then there are those who are oddly specific, or even philosophical about the task, perhaps romanticising their own qualities or copying directly from their own CV when they recommend that you are able to synchronise swim and own at least one Blue Peter badge.   So what makes this list any closer to the truth? Well, I have decided to focus not on what will make you a successful PR, but what a career in PR would be unsuccessful without.  
Why a journalism degree is helpful for a career in PR

Why a journalism degree is helpful for a career in PR

What do you get out of a degree in journalism that’s most useful when starting your career in PR? How to write How to conduct an interview The demands on a journalist How they like to be pitched to What they want to read about Considerations beyond the written word   How to write The first and most obvious thing a journalism degree teaches you, which is essential for a career in PR, is how to use words effectively. You learn how to condense a story into a short pitch. When writing a press release (which is a bit of an art form in itself) you have a better understanding of how to  write an opening line that will grab attention, whether it’s a headline for an article or the subject line of an email.  Learning how to write is absolutely crucial in PR.  
New member of the BlueSky team

New member of the BlueSky team

I’m Chris, the latest recruit to join BlueSky PR.  Until earlier this year I was PR Manager at Ashridge Business School where over the course of nearly six years I substantially increased media coverage and brand awareness. I worked with faculty and business managers to source strong news lines as well as building a strong rapport with the business education journalists. So when the opportunity to join BlueSky came along it was an ideal match to utilise my knowledge and experience gained in the business school arena.

'Growing our own' in more ways than one

At BlueSky we’re all about ‘growing our own’ in terms of talented people. It’s a concept that is integral to who we are as a company, and now it would seem that thanks to those same talented people the BlueSky family is growing in numbers once again.   Upon the receipt of the first of what we’re sure will be many baby photos, we’d like to congratulate Steph King, head of our recruitment practice, on her lovely new arrival. As well as taking the time to wish her luck for the potentially or rather, unquestionably, hectic months to come.   As a company we can now almost certainly claim that we’re fairly experienced when it comes to positively embracing the challenges that arise when some of your key players are temporarily out of office. However it’s experience that offers both short term and long term value, and embracing these changes is undoubtedly a key way to ensure that you continue to retain industry leading talent.  

The LinkedIn message we all know about

You probably hadn’t heard the name Charlotte Proudman until this week. And if you still haven’t it’s a sure sign you don’t read the news – she’s been all over it following the apparent ‘sexist’ LinkedIn message she received from solicitor Alexander Carter-Silk. You may sense that I haven’t particularly warmed to her. So what are the facts and why has she got under my skin?

Why we work more

In 1930, economist John Maynard Keynes predicted that by now, we would only be working 15 hours per week. Though, Keynes never said what we would do with all that leisure time. He was an aristocrat, he would probably want us to write poetry, dance and play the violin. Keynes once said “My only regret in life is that I didn’t drink more champagne”.   Sadly enough (or quite fortunately), his prediction never came to life.  But why exactly is this? His logic at the time made a lot of sense; the economy will grow, employees will become more productive, technology will aid all aspects of the work life, and so on.  It made sense that in such a wealthy economy people would work less. He was wrong. In an episode of NPR News’ Planet Money, economics Harvard professor Richard Friedman explains why Keynes got it wrong; Human beings are competitive   Keynes did not take into account that we are competitive by nature. This characteristic has been bred in humans for centuries, from when the first gatherer and hunters went out to hunt, to these days. We have competitiveness our DNA. Whether we compete with others or with ourselves, we always want more.   The way we feel about work    

3 Personal PR Tips From a New Starter’s Perspective

There’s no perception you should be more aware of than your own. All it takes is Googling a name to get an insight into your character or about seven seconds on average in person before someone has summed up a judgement of your character. Having joined BlueSky PR this week it’s fair to say making a strong first impression has been something of a priority, as it would be for any new starter!   These three tips are yet to fail me when in the pursuit of creating a positive perception:   Awareness of Your Online Image   Have you ever Googled yourself? If not then you should probably open a new tab and do that now, it really is that essential! It’s now a given that your potential employers may do some online research to find out aspects of your life that your CV may not discuss. This doesn’t have to be a negative thing, in fact there’s a great opportunity to use this to your advantage. For example my LinkedIn profile is currently being used and abused to showcase any past activities that may be of interest in a professional context. I have a First Class Bachelor of Arts Honours Degree, just over a year’s worth of experience in the communications field and also work with a charity supporting women in male-dominated industries. These are aspects of my life I’ve made a point of being visible online to help shape a positive perception.  

What degree do I need to get into PR?

Which degree is best for a career in PR? There’s no definitive answer.   The PR industry benefits from variety – BlueSky PR certainly does! Languages, humanities, social sciences. We’ve graduated from an array of subjects, and our diverse experiences have all helped us in our careers.   Take BlueSky’s Natalie Bishop who graduated from the University of Sheffield in English and Philosophy. She says her degree taught her there are always alternative ways of phrasing something.   This helps Natalie in PR today, like Steph King, Head of Recruitment Practice at BlueSky, who learnt how to express things clearly and concisely from her Bachelors in Politics from the University of Warwick.   “I also learnt a fair amount about drinking,” she said, “something that many people think is a prerequisite of working in PR. Sadly the days of taking journalists for boozy lunches are a thing of the past… in most cases anyway!” Regardless of topic, prioritise communication skills   Going from student seminars to working lunches, Bruce Callander, who graduated from Newcastle University in Sociology and Politics, said: “You need to be able to communicate effectively in PR, obviously. Most of my course was seminar based and having regular discussions and debates helped to develop my communication skills.   “Generally, I think you need to like learning about things and taking on knowledge – though I’m not sure if that can be taught!”   As well as Bruce and graduates from the likes of politics and philosophy, BlueSky counts journalism, law and business alumni in its ranks too.   Ian Hawkings, Head of Education Practice at BlueSky, holds a degree in Business and Management with Finance. He says: “I learned about business from a variety of perspectives, but where it has helped me in PR is to be able to see the business case for PR – and how it fits into a company’s overall strategy. This is helpful when working with clients to identify how they could use PR and communications to hit their strategic targets.” What about a degree in Public Relations?  

5 business and HR lessons from Game of Thrones – WARNING: CONTAINS SPOILERS

I’ve recently started watching Game of Thrones after months of being told how good it was, how much I’d like it and how much I was missing out on by not being a regular viewer.  Well, everyone was right – it’s amazing. Any fans don’t need me to tell them that the combination of power struggles, violence and dragons is practically unmatched on TV. However, while developing an unhealthy fascination with the series, I’ve also noticed a few key lessons that all businesses could learn from.   Build strong pipelines – Nobody liked Joffrey but at least he held King’s Landing together. He may have been utterly loathsome, evil, tyrannical and plain awful, but he did at least carry himself like royalty. However, his replacement Tommen is nothing like that and is, frankly, a poor excuse for a King. Can you really imagine him organising a defence against a siege or charging into battle? The Lannister family didn’t necessarily have a choice, but businesses do, and failing to build effective pipelines leads to poor leadership succession. We all know what happened to Apple and Disney after their leaders initially departed and the same thing could be happening to the house of Lannister, which is currently teetering on the brink.   Surround yourself with good people – You may think you can run everything, but the truth is, to be successful you have to delegate and that means you have to trust those around you. Robb Stark (RIP) made that mistake and we all know what happened to him. Tywin thought he was surrounded by people he could rely on and ended up being slain on the toilet by his own son. And as a result of that, Cersei is now surrounded by a small council made up of in-laws and relics who can’t offer any valuable advice. If you want to be successful, you have to build a good team around you who can offer additional guidance and tell you when you’re heading down the wrong path.  

The toughest interview questions and how to answer them

Last week, the media was hit with articles professing to know the “10 toughest interview questions” of all time, rendering offices everywhere pensive, interviewers inspired, and jobseekers mildly nauseous. We all like to think we’d be ready for any interview, poised, brimming with knowledge and somewhere on the spectrum of a highly caffeinated cross between Legally Blonde and Rain Man. So how do potential employers catch us off guard? How best to respond to questions designed to catch you out? And, when the going gets tough, “WWBSD?” What would BlueSky do?

Lessons of womanhood for those contemplating becoming – or continuing to be – a woman.

  Sandwiched as we are between International Women’s Day and Mother’s Day, my mind has been dwelling on questions of what, exactly, it is to be a woman in 2015. Try as I might, I can’t seem to put my finger on it – is it an instinctive, maternal compassion for others? No, I am not delusional. Is it a pride in our long struggle for equality? No, that isn’t what we are, it’s what we have already achieved. Ah! So is it long, glossy blonde hair and a fabulous pair of heels? No, unless you are looking at the world through the small, fuzzy window of a certain Pink Bus.   One theory I did seem to return to was that many of the females I know, work with, have met through friends or family or even went to school with seem to have an awareness of, an interest in, and informed opinions on women’s rights, and a collective outrage when they are breached. I hasten to add that although this can be said for most of my male friends too, I am leaving you out of my argument for simplicity’s sake (don’t be selfish, it’s International Women’s Day).  

Lessons of womanhood for those contemplating becoming – or continuing to be – a woman.

Sandwiched as we are between International Women’s Day and Mother’s Day, my mind has been dwelling on questions of what, exactly, it is to be a woman in 2015. Try as I might, I can’t seem to put my finger on it – is it an instinctive, maternal compassion for others? No, I am not delusional. Is it a pride in our long struggle for equality? No, that isn’t what we are, it’s what we have already achieved. Ah! So is it long, glossy blonde hair and a fabulous pair of heels? No, unless you are looking at the world through the small, fuzzy window of a certain Pink Bus.   One theory I did seem to return to was that many of the females I know, work with, have met through friends or family or even went to school with seem to have an awareness of, an interest in, and informed opinions on women’s rights, and a collective outrage when they are breached. I hasten to add that although this can be said for most of my male friends too, I am leaving you out of my argument for simplicity’s sake (don’t be selfish, it’s International Women’s Day).  

How movies can influence careers

It won’t have escaped your attention that last Sunday night was the annual Academy Awards where the great and the good of Hollywood lined up for their annual back-slapping and selfie festival. I didn’t watch the whole event – I made that mistake a few years ago - but it was splashed all over Monday’s press. Indeed, it was hard to avoid photos of Neil Patrick Harris in his underwear and John Travolta leering uncomfortably in the background.

Not just a company. More like a family. Just not in a ‘Godfather’ sort of way

Every company has its own, individual identity and BlueSky is no exception. All that good stuff we’re proud of like being the leaders in PR for recruitment, HR and the business and higher education sectors, not just here in the UK, but in key markets around the world. Like our funky new office, our eclectic art collection and the stuffed elephant perpetually emerging from the kitchen. But the best companies are not just about ‘brand’, they’re about people. Which is why, in a way, they are also like families.  And right now BlueSky couldn’t be more like a family because we’re not only producing great work and great results for our clients, we also seem to be producing children regularly.   Fortunately they don’t seem to be cluttering up the shop-floor as yet (the crèche won’t be quite ready for a while) and they do have the unfortunate side effect of taking some of our people out of the line for a while, but we’ve come to live with and positively embrace it.  

A new addition to the team!

Hi, I’m Natalie and it is with great enthusiasm that I write this blog to say hello as the newest member of the BlueSky PR team. I will be working on the recruitment side of the business as an administrator and am keen to learn as much as I possibly can to lay the foundations for a future career in PR here at BlueSky.   Just over a year ago, I graduated with a degree in English and Philosophy from the University of Sheffield and set my heart on a career which would combine my love of writing and creativity with my interest in the media and the evolution of social media. Realistically, I ended up in an in-house accounts role. Much to the dismay of anyone with an accounts-related query at lunchtime, I would spend my breaks with my nose in a book reading anything and everything from newspapers, autobiographies and media textbooks, to novels or, occasionally, the exclusively sports-related publications residing in the office (usually circa 2009 or earlier). I knew it was time to follow my heart (nose?) and am absolutely delighted to be here working for BlueSky.  

A new addition to the team!

Hi, I’m Natalie and it is with great enthusiasm that I write this blog to say hello as the newest member of the BlueSky PR team. I will be working on the recruitment side of the business as an administrator and am keen to learn as much as I possibly can to lay the foundations for a future career in PR here at BlueSky.

Halloween horror stories

With it being Halloween it seemed to make sense to do this week’s blog on a relevant and often terrifying subject. That’s why I’ve asked the BlueSky team for their worst, scariest or weirdest interview or employment experiences:   Tracey – “When I was in recruitment some of our interview rooms had sofas. One of my candidates was early so he was shown into the interview room to wait for me. When the allotted appointment time arrived I entered to find him fast asleep. I thought he had passed out but it turned out he just had the mother of all hangovers. He was actually a good candidate and later secured a role, but he wasn’t exactly firing on all cylinders that morning”.   Vickie – “I once went to an interview where the interviewer discovered he hadn’t booked a meeting room and they were all full. As a result, we ended up having the meeting in the only room available – a storage cupboard! After 20 minutes perched on a box of paper in a very small windowless room, I felt highly embarrassed leaving the cupboard to many amused looks from the rest of the staff. I can only imagine what they thought!”   Kerry – “Not long after I left university, I applied for a job online as a ‘copywriter’ at what was described as a new local publication in my home town. I was invited to interview, and attended on three separate occasions because the first two times I showed up the boss had forgotten he was meeting me. When I finally sat down with him in a dingy room of a rundown office block, he spent the first 15 minutes talking about himself and his wonderful hugely successful career. He then went on to tell me I’d actually be cold-calling for ad sales for a publication that was little more than a glorified monthly newsletter. I’d be paid per ad placement, but wouldn’t be paid for the first month whilst I learned how to use the phone… I made my excuses and left.”   Steph M –

Gender diversity: Let's talk about progress

  It’s been an interesting week for British women. Not only has the Church of England voted to allow women to become bishops for the first time in its history, David Cameron’s reshuffle has doubled the number of women in Cabinet to eight.   This has seen an influx of articles that insist progress is forging new pathways like never before, yet others that argue change is still desperately needed and, in a way, they’re both right.   Which isn’t surprising when you consider that gender equality is a topic that remains high on the news agenda – inextricably connected to issues of diversity and leadership – and that’s why the headlines this week were littered with “women bishops” and “women MPs”. Headlines like these simply won’t stop being front page news while female representation remains so low.   Essentially, the issue here stems from the lack of women in leadership.  

Blood donors for cats, Batman and the real power of social media

Working in a content-heavy industry I tend to make extensive notes and scribblings. Last week I was working on a press release and looked down to my notepad to see the phrase ‘blood donors for cats’. I had no recollection of writing this and it wasn’t relevant to anything I was working on but it caught my eye and I had to investigate further. It turns out that this was related to the program, Supervet on Channel 4, that my colleague had watched that highlighted the true power of social media. Supervet The program had reported the story of a cat that had been hit by a car and was in desperate need of medical attention and crucially, blood.  Not being a feline aficionado, I questioned whether there was a large enough pool of cats that are willing to become blood donors, but after sending out a Facebook post, the vet received three responses (from owners) while the surgery was taking place. In any other circumstance it would be impossible to contact such a wide network of people immediately and seek help. But by harnessing social media the vet was able to get hold of the right type of cat blood, which I imagine isn’t readily available, and ultimately it went on to make a full recovery. Stephen Sutton And this isn’t the only example of social media being used for real good. Stephen Sutton made the news recently for raising over £4m for the teenage cancer trust at the time of his death on May 14th. This incredible achievement wouldn’t have been possible without the networking potential of platforms like Twitter, Facebook & Google + and their ability to transmit messages to truly global audiences and raise awareness. #bringbackourgirls We’ve also seen the #bringbackourgirls hashtag that has helped to alert the world to the plight of more than 200 kidnapped school girls in Nigeria. While millions of people read the stories in newspapers across the world, it was only through social media that the campaign was really able to get going and build up support that was impossible to ignore.

What to expect from your first job interview

Last week my sister, who is still a student, walked into an interview room for a summer job – she was completely terrified. She rang me up to say she had got the role. It came as a surprise – I could hear it in her voice, as she said she could not answer some of the questions that had been posed.   I guess we all have moments of self-doubt and perhaps the younger and less experienced we are the more we feel the stress of a job interview. But sometimes we’re good! And we should own it!   Perhaps all job interviews are just as important but the real clincher is the first interview into your future career. The job you dream of doing and becoming exceptionally good at. You want to get that one right, leave an impression and make sure you get the call with an offer.   I have read numerous blog posts claiming that the majority of first interviews are unsuccessful for various reasons. So I was also curious to find out how the first job interviews went for the amazing people I share an office with, and what advice they would give to someone attending their first interview. Tracey Barrett ‘’ My first job interview was for Bejam, the frozen food retailer (now Iceland), as a management trainee in 1983. The interviewer asked me to sell them the ashtray sitting on the desk (yes you could smoke in the office in those days). I threw it out of the window and said “You haven’t got an ashtray have you?”  I got the job!  ‘’ Ian Hawkings ‘’ My first proper job interview was for a well-known recruitment firm- they did a standard interview for about 30 mins and then took me onto the sales floor, gave me a bunch of CVs and made me cold-call candidates….while they watched and listened. It was terrifying. ’’  Kerry Gill ‘’ The most entertaining story I could tell you about would be from one of my first interviews after graduating. I’d applied for a position advertised as a “Content Writer” at a local newspaper. After submitting my CV, a cover letter and a few examples of my work, I was invited for an interview at the office. When I turned up, I realised the office was two rooms above a pub on the high street… not a very encouraging start! When I walked inside, the place was in complete disarray. The walls looked grubby, some of the ceiling tiles were missing, it didn’t smell great and there was stuff everywhere. The staff were all my age and paid me no attention at all when I arrived. When finally someone did notice me I introduced myself and said I was there for an interview. After a few blank looks the girl gave me a scrap of paper (ripped from another person’s CV) to write my mobile number on as the boss wasn’t there. She told me to come back later, not giving a specific time.   ‘’ Foolishly, I did go back. I actually met the boss this time. He guided me into his office (a small room with bare walls, a disproportionately large desk, a chair and a small plastic coffee table strewn with books) sat down and proceeded to tell me that I was going to flog ad space over the phone for unheard of local newspapers all around the Midlands. Cold calling for minimum wage, with an unpaid trial period to “test my abilities”. Needless to say I turned down the job offer when it came two weeks later! ''   Stephanie Mullins’ first real interview was similar to mine; we both interviewed for the company we work for now. We both have some good stories to tell but perhaps some other time. For all it’s worth, I would advise you to expect something different in your interview – I sure didn’t and it took me by surprise.   When Adrian Barrett interviewed me, one of the questions was: ‘’what country had lost a war but came out of it wealthier than when it joined?’’ My reaction: straight face. My answer: ‘’In all honesty, warfare is not one of my strongest points.’’ (By this time I was wondering whether I was still being interviewed for a PR role). But I was able to mention some of the ongoing wars and I proved that I had some knowledge of the war related news stories. I understand the role of that question now.  

Is PR to blame for the Monday blues?

Rush hour traffic, an overflowing inbox and the working week ahead. Yes, it’s Monday again.   But did you know, you might hate Monday because of a PR stunt?   ‘Blue Monday’ was a name given to a date in January to be the most depressing day of the year – and it was all part of a publicity campaign. It was included in a press release by the public relations agency appointed by Sky Travel.   My colleague, Alex Dobocan, said: “Blue Monday came about as a PR stunt but it seems to have had success and made us all regard Mondays as… well, depressing.   “Whilst we all dread endings and we could agree they are never all that pleasant, when it comes to ending a week we are more excited than anything! So why are we not treating Monday as any other start? - An exciting time to make things happen, to plan and to conquer.” Monday: the day we love to hate   Taking this positive attitude, and inspired by a paragraph on Tumblr, I’d like to tell you a little more about these Mondays that we love to hate.  

Forget the internship, bring on the returnship

As a woman who took a relatively lengthy career break to care for my children, I was interested to learn about the launch of a new scheme by Credit Suisse in London to help senior professional women re-start their careers after taking time out of the workplace.  Dubbed the “returnship”, the Real Returns programme is the first UK example of an idea which has been gathering pace in the US over the last few years.  The scheme involves returners taking on CV-worthy projects that draw on their existing skills and experience and being paid accordingly.  It’s effectively putting a toe back in the water of the corporate world, allowing women - who have perhaps lost confidence in their abilities - the opportunity to prove that they’ve still got what it takes to succeed and that it is actually possible to juggle corporate life and a family. 70% of women fear taking a career break This story really struck a chord with me personally, as believe me, when you’ve been out of the corporate world for a good few years, the prospect of going back is a daunting one indeed.  Once you’ve jumped off the train, it’s very hard to jump back on.  In fact, a recent survey from London Business School shows 70% of women fear taking a career break.  Nagging doubts about whether you can still do your job, whether you’ll be up to speed with new technology and how you’ll combine a working day with the working day you usually put in as the primary carer are more than enough to put you off even looking for a role. Female brain drain I know of far too many professional women –experienced, bright, capable and very well-organised – who have never returned to work after having a family.  Not only is this a great loss to the professional world and the wider economy, but it’s also a personal loss for these ladies.  All of that brain power, time invested in studying - in most cases for a degree or professional qualification – not to mention years spent climbing the career ladder, potentially sidelined for a future of domestic drudgery or a low-paid job for which they are massively over-qualified!