POSTED BY Kerry Ruffle

How to work effectively with media in China

How to work effectively with media in China

China is home to an estimated 1.3 Billion people, is the world’s second largest economy and has one of the one of the largest media markets in the world. Unsurprisingly, being able to tap into it is a highly appealing prospect for any higher education institution.
7 steps to securing meetings for your faculty abroad

7 steps to securing meetings for your faculty abroad

Whether accompanying MBA students on international study trips, attending overseas recruitment fairs or speaking at industry events, such excursions provide the ideal opportunity to raise the profile of their school on a wider scale by engaging with local media.
Who are you pitching to?

Who are you pitching to?

When sending a pitch to a journalist, what’s the first thing you need to check before hitting send? Checking your information is accurate perhaps? Making sure it’s short, swift and to the point? Making sure you’ve spelled their name correctly?
7 steps to securing meetings for your faculty abroad

7 steps to securing meetings for your faculty abroad

As institutions strive to become ever more visible around the world and business education programmes become increasingly global in their teaching, business school faculty are required to spend greater amounts of time on the road.   Whether accompanying MBA students to emerging markets for international study trips, attending overseas recruitment events or speaking at industry events, such excursions provide the ideal opportunity for communications teams to raise the profile of their institutions – and their faculties – at a local level by sharing their expertise with local media.   But securing the chance for your professors to sit down with the most influential titles in the country can prove to be a more of a challenge than it is at home.   So in an environment where your faculty are relatively unknown, where your school’s brand carries arguably less clout than it does locally, and faced with short time frames, tricky timezones and languages barriers how can you give your faculty the best chance possible of getting in front of the world’s media?   How to secure meetings for your faculty with journalists abroad Plan early What is the purpose of the trip? What can they talk about? Why should journalists care? Do your research Don't be difficult Be realistic  
5 Ingredients for a successful story

5 Ingredients for a successful story

Not all news is news.   And any PR professional doing their job properly knows that securing quality media coverage isn’t just about flinging every bit of information a client shares with them out into the world and hoping some of it gets noticed. We spend a great deal of time sifting through the information our clients share with us to find the stories that will make the best impact with their target audiences.   But sometimes those stories that can be media gold aren’t always the easiest to spot, or even the easiest to communicate clearly and convincingly to your press contacts.   To stand the best chance of success, there are five ingredients that need to be included in your pitches...   1. A clear focus What are you trying to communicate? Consider the information you are sharing and keep the message as clear, and simplistic as possible. Your pitch cannot be too lengthy or have too many tangents. A time-pressed journalist needs to be able to scan your pitch and immediately identify what you/your client is offering, and what their angle on that topic is.   2. Relevance It might sound obvious, but you’ve got to know your audience. Before pitching take the steps to ensure that the information you’re sharing with journalists is something which will appeal to each of their individual areas of expertise. What are they writing about? Have they already covered the topic you’re sharing?   3. A strong spokesperson… The ideas you put forward in your pitch are only as strong as the person who voices them. It is vital to ensure you pitch a person who can speak confidently and eloquently with the media, and have the experience and expertise to lend authority to their perspectives.   4. …With something new to say! It’s no good having a strong spokesperson if they’re only able to tell a journalist what they already know. Take the time to craft a new angle on the topic at hand with your spokesperson in order to provide your media targets with a fresh way of telling, or adding to a story.  
Why journalists won’t quote your client…

Why journalists won’t quote your client…

Sometimes, no matter how much effort you put in, things just don’t work out. You might think your client is the ideal person to feature in a journalist’s article about the advancements of online education or the gender pay gap, you’ve swiftly pitched them to the journalist listing their various attributes, and you might have even submitted a comment or secured a phone interview. But, when the article is published your client has not managed to make it into the text - so why don't journalists quote your client?   It's frustrating? Yes. And it can happen for a myriad of reasons, many of which might be outside of your control – for example the journalist might not have had enough space within the word count to squeeze in your client’s comments. But there might be a little more to it.   Are you doing all you can to give your client the best chance possible of being quoted? Being proactive and quick to jump on a news story is only part of the process. Keeping these four checkpoints in mind when pitching your clients to the media, whilst not guaranteeing a positive result every time, can help to reduce the number of occasions where your client is left disappointed.    
How working with other institutions benefits all

How working with other institutions benefits all

Do you often find yourself missing out when looking to attract mainstream media attention with your school’s news? Whether it’s the statistics surrounding class make-up, faculty research or a particularly astute comment from the Dean on the state of modern business education, communications staff are often faced with journalists turning their institution’s news down, or ignoring it entirely, regardless of how genuinely interesting it may be. The grim reality is that the relevance, and thus the impact of the information they’re sharing with the media often decreases the further it travels outside of the school’s immediate community, even when these topics are ones that are routinely the subject of discussion in the likes of the Financial Times, Poets&Quants and the Times Higher Education. It can often be hard to stand out from the crowd when every other school is seeking to do the same thing. But there is strength to be found in numbers. Though it might sound counterintuitive, sometimes the most effective way of shining a spotlight on your institution and your faculty’s expertise is by also highlighting someone else’s. Far from it being a detriment to your own exposure, joining forces with others, whether directly or indirectly, can actually help to secure a better result. The question any credible reporter will ask upon receiving your press release or your pitch is, “so what?”. Alone, your school might not be able answer that question sufficiently. However, when partnered with evidence from a handful of other institutions (whether this compliments the information you’re sharing or contradicts it) you can present the journalist with the foundation of a richer story – a trend, a discussion which can be stretched from the findings of just one institution to become a wider comment on the industry as a whole. Far from diluting your message, working in this way can improve your school’s exposure and reputation by confirming to journalists that your faculty have a wider, well-informed view, which extends outside of your school’s campus.   We hope you found these insights helpful.  If you’d like to discuss how your institution can collaborate with others,  the BlueSky Education team would be happy to advise.    For the full article download Wildfire Volume 2. Issue 1.  
Media Advice: Essential steps when a journalist says yes

Media Advice: Essential steps when a journalist says yes

You’ve spoken with your client and clued yourself up on the topic at hand, you’ve devised an appropriate strategy for press activity, you’ve created an effective pitch and researched the most appropriate press outlets and, finally, you’ve got the journalist to give your client the go-ahead. Job done, right?   Wrong.   Media advice: Managing the interview process   Though we’re told time and again that the difficult part of the job is getting your client in front of a journalist, in reality that is only half of the battle. The really tricky part, sometimes, is keeping the journalist interested in what your client has to say once they’re there.   Just because a journalist has decided to speak with your client or has welcomed a written comment from them, there is no guarantee this will result in a piece of worthwhile press coverage.   So how can you ensure you can get the most out of the opportunity in front of you? What essential actions should you take once a journalist says “yes”?   1.      Get all the details:   Before you approach your client you should first establish exactly what the journalist is after. How would they like to carry out the interview? What is their deadline for receiving comment? What is the word count for the op-ed you’ve proposed? If it’s a telephone interview, when are they available to speak? And, what exactly are they looking for your client to discuss? Do they need images? By clarifying these details from the outset you can approach your client armed with all the necessary information and avoid any potential problems further down the line.  

Lessons from fabulous Frankfurt

  “Pull up a chair. Take a taste. Come join us. Life is so endlessly delicious.” ― Ruth Reichl   The words of American Chef Rachel Reichl could have been the ones of MaKi Conference hosts as we walked into a bright lecture room at Frankfurt School of Management and Finance in Germany. The room vibrated with enthusiasm and good will. It was to become to home of some of the greatest PRs in the world for the coming days.   Last week I attended one of the global MaKi Conferences. MaKi brings together communication professionals in the business education sector from all over the world. We meet regularly to participate in journalist panels and exchange good communications practices in the sector.   On this occasion we had the pleasure of speaking to Reuters, The Wall Street Journal, Handelsblatt and Die Welt, to name a few. This gave us some great insight into what the MBA market in Germany looks like and how the German press likes to cover business school topics.  
Financial crises shorten your life

Financial crises shorten your life

  In our line of work, and especially here at BlueSky PR, we have the pleasure of working with some great minds from the higher and business education arenas. All of these people strive to make the world a better place and they employ different methods in achieving this aim. Whether they engage in research, projects or just teaching, talking to them is always revealing.   In the past couple of weeks I have been working on a piece of research from Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University (RSM). The study looks at the impact of financial crises – not necessarily on society as a whole but on the individual. Professor Mathijs A. van Dijk discovered that life expectancy decreases by an average of nine months in the five years following a financial crisis.   We know little about the broader impact of financial crises on society as a whole. Media reports suggest potentially severe effects on health, education, and poverty. Some countries reported higher rates of suicide, falling birth-rates, increased HIV prevalence and more people going into poverty. In the U.K., an additional four percent of 18-25 year olds went into poverty in the aftermath of the crisis.  
It’s not all about the quick hits

It’s not all about the quick hits

  They say good things come to those who wait, and a recent piece of coverage has proven to us here at BlueSky that they might have been right...     This week saw the publication of ‘Great Places To Study Business Abroad: An International Student Guide’ on Forbes. It featured students from all 29 partner schools in 29 different countries from our client CEMS, the Global Alliance in Management Education.     For a number of weeks, we worked with CEMS to survey these students, catalogue their responses and create a guide that would be useful for the huge numbers of students looking for advice and guidance on studying in a foreign country. The response from our client has been fantastic. You’ll see from the picture below that Rebecca Rosinski, CEMS Marketing Manager, has wallpapered her office with the coverage we’ve helped her achieve.

Cutting through the noise: Quirky PR for Business and Higher Education

Business Education is a mature market, and with so many programmes out there and relatively few publications writing about them, there is a constant competition between schools for worthwhile coverage. On the other side of the fence, journalists are under considerable pressure to deliver news from education institutions in a new and engaging way.
Client Q&A with Patricia Rousseau, Communications & PR Officer at the Vlerick Business School, in Belgium

Client Q&A with Patricia Rousseau, Communications & PR Officer at the Vlerick Business School, in Belgium

Patricia Rousseau is the Communications and PR Officer at the Vlerick Business School in Belgium. In this Q&A she discusses her role at Vlerick, why she feels the use of PR to be important for business schools, and any advice for those looking to introduce PR to their institution.